Course Descriptions & Related Information

Bible

BIB 103 Introduction to Biblical Interpretation 3 credits

A practical introduction to the study of the Bible. The course provides an overview of fundamental issues of interpretation, inspiration, manuscripts, and translation. Emphasis is on basic approaches to Bible study and appropriate use of biblical reference tools.
Only required for non-ministry majors.

BIB 200 Biblical Theology 3 credits

A study of the major biblical and theological themes of both testaments. Emphasis on discovering the flow of ideas that bind the different books of the Bible into a unified whole.
Prerequisite: OLT 123, NWT 113.

BIB 213 Hermeneutics 3 credits

An advanced study of the history, theory, and practice of biblical interpretation. This course emphasizes knowledge, understanding, and skills for pastoral and scholarly study of the Scripture including a review of current approaches and developments.
Prerequisite: OLT 123, NWT 113

BIB 303 Teaching the Bible Creatively 3 credits

A course for all who desire to teach the Bible more effectively and creatively. Designed to develop basic principles and practices in the teaching of the Bible as well as studying methods, materials, learning theory, and meeting individual differences in all age groups.

BIB 312 The Bible: From Inspiration to Translation 2 credits

A study of the canon, text, ancient manuscripts, transmission and translation of the Bible. Special attention is given to the history of the English Bible and modern translation theories.

BIB 413 Daniel-Revelation 3 credits

An integrative and exegetical study of these two prophetic books from a pre-millennial perspective in light of other interpretive approaches. Historical background, literary genre, and theological teachings of each book will be examined.

BIB 463 Biblical Archaeology 3 credits

The study of excavations and discoveries that have a bearing on the Bible. The course is designed to acquaint the student with the nature of archaeology and its contribution to biblical studies.
May be offered with BIB 493.

BIB 491-3Topics in Bible3 credits

Special topics of varied interest are offered as needed and as resources permit.

Business

BUS 200 Explorations in Business 3 credits

An introduction to functions of business, including business organization and accounting, management of financial resources, management of human resources, marketing of goods and services, and principles of economic decision making. Open to all students.

BUS 213 Accounting I 3 credits

The fundamentals of financial, cost, and managerial accounting. An overview of practical aspects of accounting systems, understanding financial statements, cash flow, assets, liabilities, statement analysis, variable and fixed costs, short- and long- term financing alternatives, and their impact on decision making.
Prerequisites: CMS 283, MTH 213 (MTH 213 not required for Business/Accounting track majors.)

BUS 223 Accounting II 3 credits

A continuation of Accounting I. Emphasis on managerial accounting, including financial statement presentation, theoretical and practical aspects of accounting, and development of accounting records.
Prerequisite: BUS 213.

BUS 233 Business Ethics 3 credits

Humans are moral beings facing a variety of moral decisions on a daily basis. This course examines the subject of ethical dilemmas and decisions in the business environment from both a secular perspective and a Judeo-Christian ethics paradigm. This course will sensitize students to ethical business dilemmas and provide a technique for analyzing them. Students will try to answer the questions: can businesses compete if required to function ethically; and does this require moral prerequisites to be able to do so? Students will read essays on questions in business ethics and will also read cases that are examples of ethical dilemmas. Students will be able to compare and contrast various types of ethical standards, with an emphasis on a Christian worldview.
Prerequisites: BUS 200, BUS 313.

BUS 235 Nonprofit and Government 3 credits

A continuation of Accounting I and II, this course covers budgeting, record-keeping, and financial reporting for nonprofit organizations with an emphasis on internal records management and control.
Prerequisite: BUS 223.

BUS 243 New Venture Accounting & Finance 3 credits

This course is an introduction to the terminology, concepts, problem solving, and techniques in accounting and finance specific to new ventures. Important areas to be discussed include understanding financial statements, basic analysis of financial statements, budgeting, working capital management, capital budgeting, long-term debt, equity funding, working capital management, small business accounting and tax accounting.
Prerequisite: MTH 213, CMS 283, BUS 200.

BUS 253 Macroeconomics 3 credits

An overview of the organization of American economic systems. Introduces basic terminology, concepts, and issues. Examines economic variables such as consumption, government expenditures, taxes, investments, issues of unemployment, inflation, deficits, economic law, and monetary policies.
Prerequisite: MTH 213.

BUS 303 Introduction to Finance 3 credits

Introduction to the theories and practice of corporate finance. Topics include financial statements, corporate securities, net present value, investment management, capital budgeting, market efficiency, and the concept of risk and return.
Prerequisites: BUS 213, BUS 253, and MTH 203.

BUS 313 Business Management 3 credits

A study of modern management theory. Overall focus on managerial functions such as planning, organizing, leading, controlling and decision making in both the nonprofit and profit sectors. The fundamentals of the management of organizational structure, culture, goals, motivation, teams, human resources, operations, change and the integration of technology.

BUS 323 Intermediate Accounting 3 credits

A continuation of Accounting II. Extensively covers the preparation of financial statements using the most recent developments in the field. Includes coverage of cash and receivables, inventories, operational assets, and financial investments.
Prerequisites: BUS 223.

BUS 333 Cost Accounting 3 credits

Covers cost estimation and analysis of materials, labor, and manufacturing expenses. Highlights job order processing, activity-based costing, and the use of cost information in management.
Prerequisites: BUS 223.

BUS 343 Marketing and Public Relations 3 credits

Marketing and public relations in profit and nonprofit organizations. Introduces basic theory, terminology, and major components of marketing and public relations. Reviews practices of current organizations.

BUS 353 Microeconomics 3 credits

A study of microeconomic theory and issues. Examines behaviors of individual consumers, wage and price theories, marketing of particular products, competition, market structure, and current micro-economic problems.
Prerequisite: BUS 253.

BUS 373 Nonprofit Start-Up & Fundraising 3 credits

Introduction to the nature, role and unique challenges of nonprofit organizations. Includes techniques and projects for nonprofit start-up and fundraising. Examines the trend of faith-based nonprofits, their structures and relationships to the community and the church. Case study applications cover health care, education, charitable, community, cultural and faith-based organizations.

BUS 383 International Aspects of Business 3 credits

Study of the multidisciplinary development of strategies addressing economic, legal, governmental, political, financial and cultural issues associated with the international business environment. Focus is placed on opportunities for, threats to, and options facing international, multinational, global, and transnational business enterprises. Emphasis is placed on employing the most effective business strategies based on the examination of host government, work force, consumer needs and preferences, technology, and the demands and tactics for responding to them.
Prerequisites: BUS 200, BUS 313.

BUS 403 Business Law 3 credits

Review of the history and philosophy of legal issues governing business law. Covers federal, state, and local laws, regulatory systems, constitutional issues, and the impact of legal structures on profit and nonprofit business practices.
Prerequisites: BUS 200, BUS 313.

BUS 413 Business Policy 3 credits

An integration of knowledge from accounting, economics, marketing, and business management. Examines case studies in real world business situations. Analysis of decision-making strategies, business objectives, policy development, measurement of performance, and response to change.
Prerequisite: Senior Business Administration majors, completion of all required Junior-level Business courses.

BUS 423 Advanced Business Research and Communication 3 credits

This course aims to help students develop an understanding of how research is carried out in management settings, and to appreciate some of the specific problems and issues faced with communicating research results to the business world. It provides an overview to the field of management and business studies and the associated range of research paradigms and theoretical traditions. It examines the strengths and weaknesses of competing approaches to research and some of the main ethical and practical problems that are encountered in carrying out research into organizations. A focused semester research project will allow the student to explore a specific area of concentration, and then communicate the results of their research in an appropriate venue.
Prerequisites: MTH 113, BUS 233, BUS 253, BUS 313, BUS 353.

BUS 425 International Business Law3 credits

A course in law as it applies to international business transactions in the global political legal environment. Students will study inter-relationships among laws of different countries and the legal effects on individuals and business organizations. Topics include agency agreements, international contracts and administrations, regulations of exports and imports, technology transfers, regional transactions, intellectual property, product liability, and legal organization.
Prerequisites: BUS 200, BUS 313, BUS 383.

BUS 430 Auditing 3 credits

Examines the basic auditing standards, theories, and concepts used by independent accountants and internal auditors. Includes coverage of internal controls, statistical and non-statistical auditing tools, professional responsibilities, and ethics.
Prerequisites: BUS 323.

BUS 433 Federal Income Tax Accounting 3 credits

Covers current federal tax laws and accounting principles related to partnerships and corporations. Also includes study of individual federal income taxes.

BUS 435 Perspectives on Dark Leadership 3 credits

This course studies leadership from the unique perspective that some leaders are corrupt, narcissistic, unethical and motivated by power and greed. Students will objectively study the framework of leadership evaluation, the personality and psychology of leaders, and what factors lead to the success or failure of the organizations, businesses and countries that dark leadership archetypes control.
Prerequisites: BUS 200, BUS 233, BUS 313, BUS 383.

BUS 453 Human Resource Management 3 credits

Principles and practices in supervising employees and administering personnel programs with insight into the evolving role of strategic Human Resource Management in today’s organizations, the strategic role of human resource functions, and the impact of technology and global competition.

BUS 463 Production/Operations Management 3 credits

Covers quantitative techniques used to assist managers with production and operations decisions including supply chain management, quality management, waiting line management, inventory management, and scheduling.
Prerequisite: CMS 283, MTH 203.

BUS 483 Business Admin Internship 4 credits

This course is designed to enhance academic learning with practical, hands-on experience. For a minimum of 2 credit hours (maximum of 4 credit hours), students will work side-by-side with a business organization in one or more of the following areas: Accounting, Finance, Marketing, Operations Management, or Human Resource Management. Each credit hour is equivalent to 75 hours of actual work experience.
Work content must be approved by the Business Department. Prerequisite: Senior standing or Business faculty approval

BUS 489 Small Business Entrepreneurship 3 credits

An advanced course designed to expose the student to specific topics in the development of a new venture (small business, family business, new venture within a larger company). Functions such as planning, starting, owning, organizing, financing, promoting, hiring, relating to employees, purchasing, profit planning, budgeting, controlling, technology, risk management, and maintaining good government relations will be covered.
Prerequisites: BUS 243, BUS 303, BUS 483.

BUS 453New Venture Business Planning3 credits

An advanced course designed to assist the student in the development of a comprehensive business plan. The semester project will allow the student to concentrate on a specific area of business interest. An experienced individual mentor will be assigned as an additional resource to assist the student in the course. It is recommended that students take this course in their final semester prior to graduation.
Prerequisite: BUS 489.

Church Music Ministry

CHM 322 Hymnology 2 credits

A study of the hymnody of the Christian Church. The history of text and tune from the New Testament times to the present day will be studied. Criteria for the evaluation of hymns, ideas for their use, and theological aspects of hymnody also will be included.

CHM 413 Church Music Administration 3 credits

A course designed to prepare the student for a music leadership role in the church. Class will cover principles of building, developing, and administering a music program.

CHM 422Musical Productions 2 credits

A course designed to introduce the student to the principles of creating a musical production in the church setting. Emphasis is primarily placed on the administration of Christmas and Easter productions.

CHM 441 Worship Leading Seminar I .5 credits

A course designed for students to learn the practical aspects of leading worship. Students will lead worship at least five times in a variety of settings during the semester. Each worship experience will be recorded and reviewed by the instructor and the class. Course is designed for beginning worship leaders and meets once per week. This class should be taken during the sophomore year.

CHM 442 Worship Leading Seminar II .5 credits

A course designed as a continuation of Worship Lead- ing Seminar I. Students will plan and lead worship at least five times in a variety of settings during the se- mester. Additionally, students will develop rehearsal techniques and continue to hone practical skills. Advanced music knowledge and experience is required. Students must be matriculated Church Music majors to register for this course. Class meets once per week and should be taken during the junior year.
Prerequisite: CHM 441.

CHM 443 Worship Leading Seminar III .5 credits

A course designed as a continuation of Worship Leading Seminar II. Students will plan and lead worship at least five times in a variety of settings during the semester. At this level, the instructor will work with the student to strengthen specific skills. At the end of this course, the student will have a digital portfolio that demonstrates worship leading skills. Advanced music knowledge and experience is required. Students must be matriculated Church Music Majors to register for this course. Class meets once per week and should be taken during the senior year.
Prerequisite: CHM 442.

CHM 491-3 Topics in Church Music 1-3 credits

Special topics of varied interest are offered as needed and as resources permit.

Computer Science

CMS 131 Introduction to Spreadsheets 1 credit

A course which presents the basics of electronic spreadsheets using the Microsoft® Excel program.Students will learn in a lab environment which maximizes student participation while maintaining teacher involvement. Emphasis is placed on real-world applications for spreadsheet usage.

CMS 153 Visual Basic Programming 3 credits

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of object oriented programming techniques using the Visual Basic programming language. Topics include problem analysis and algorithm design, coding, variables, assignments, expressions, constants, conditional statements, iterative structures, classes objects, algorithm implementation and testing using common software tools such as editors, compilers, linkers and debuggers.

CMS 200 Computer Networks 3 credits

This course is an introductory look at computer communication from an engineering perspective. It will focus on the principles of computer communication and the basic concepts in the architecture of computer networks. As an introductory course, it covers a broad set of concepts and implementations, addressing both theory and practice, using the layered model of computer communications. Labs are used to reinforce concepts and develop practical networking skills.

CMS 201 Statistical Computer Applications 1 credit

This course introduces statistical analysis skills utilizing SPSS® software. Online resources, data and output management and interactive graphics are used to arrive at meaningful analysis.
Lab and License fee $50.

CMS 221 Advanced Word Processing 1 credit

Use of mail merge, advanced formatting, creation and use of templates and add-ins, macros, toolbars, auto-text, sorting, cross-referencing, working with long documents, using graphics, tables, and specialized formatting.
Prerequisite: Computer proficiency.

CMS 233 Educational Technology 3 credits

This course provides an in-depth examination of technology used in the educational setting. Included are digital media applications, along with projected, non-projected and audio media. The integration of media into the lesson planning process is a crucial component of the course. A student portfolio is developed in association with concurrent or previous field experience. All Secondary English Education majors will complete their field experience concurrent with this course.

CMS 253 Programming and Data Structures I 3 credits

Using the C+ programming language, this course introduces algorithmic problem solving, basic control and data structures, and procedural abstraction. Topics include language syntax and semantics, arithmetic expressions, operators, functional decomposition, functional calls and parameters, file input and output, identifier scope and lifetime, switch and loop structures, array processing, strings, searching and sorting.

CMS 263 Programming and Data Structures II 3 credits

Using the Java programming language and building upon Programming and Data Structures I, this course considers a variety of programming topics including GUIs, Exceptions, Recursion, Containers, Abstract Data Types, Containers, Stacks and Queues, Lists, Heaps, Trees, and Sorts. Students will be introduced to Unified Modeling Language [UML] to represent classes and their relations.

CMS 283 Computer Applications for Business 3 credits

Applications and lab exercises in the use of popular software with particular emphasis on word processing, electronic spreadsheets, presentations, and database management.
Prerequisite: Computer proficiency.

CMS 300 System Foundations 3 credits

This course considers computer systems at three levels of abstraction: machine, assembly, and operating system. Topics include von Neumann machines, machine languages and addressing modes, assembly language and symbol tables, data structures at the assembly level, finite state machines, language grammars, parsing, process management and interrupts, deadlocks, semaphores, and virtual memory.

CMS 412 Database Management Structures 3 credits

An examination of database management structures using prepared software packages. Emphasis is on the selection and design of program features to accomplish data management functions in the organizational environment.

CMS 481 Integrated Technology Practicum 1 credit

Supervised internship in at least three different areas including video reinforcement, professional audio systems, and publications. May be assigned to music department, advancement office, faculty support, information technology, or other appropriate area. A minimum of 75 hours of hands-on experience.
Prerequisite: Approval of the Instructor. May be repeated for credit.

CMS 491 Networking 2 credits

This course introduces the basic principles of computer networking. Includes overview of OSI model, local area networks, configuration, basic troubleshooting, network protocols, and network applications.
Prerequisite: Approval of the Instructor.

CMS 492 Management of Information 3 credits

Systems Development and use of management information systems in charitable and human service agencies.
Prerequisite: CMS 283.

CMS 493 Topics in Computer Science 3 credits

Systems Development and use of management information systems in charitable and human service agencies.
Prerequisite: CMS 283.

Communications

COM 123 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 credits

A basic course in public speaking designed to provide both theory and practice in principles of effective speech composition and communication.

COM 136 Mass Media and Society 3 credits

Overview of the history, organization, economics, content, control, and effects of mass communications on society. Examination of mass media industries, including print, broadcast, cable, film, telephony, and the Internet.

COM 143 Communication Theory 3 credits

A study of the theories of human and mass-mediated communication with an emphasis on research and writing. Topics include communication system theory, signs and languages, discourse, message reception and receiving, social and cultural realities, and critical theories.
Prerequisites: ENG 123 or 497 and COM 123 or 494.

COM 163Introduction to Digital Media3 credits

Survey of the personal and business uses of the individualized media including interactive TV, video games, multimedia, online services, blogs, webcasting and podcasting, digital downloads, chat rooms, bulletin boards, and e-marketing. Covers technological, social, and economic implications for users, producers, and distributors of traditional new media.

COM 283 Intercultural Communications 3 credits

An introductory course in communications between those of various cultures dealing with core culture and value orientation. The silent language and problems of Americans in other cultures are brought into focus.

COM 301 Freelancing and Shameless Self-Promotion 3 credits

This course covers topics in freelancing, starting a business, branding, and social media marketing. Featuring a skill-building approach to course topics, this course equips students to start and publicize their own business using available tools and techniques. Students will learn to establish their personal businesses ethically and legally.
Prerequisites: COM 136 and COM 143. Junior rank or higher.

COM 303 Interpersonal Communication 3 credits

The study of the nature of interpersonal communication theory, processes and relationships. Examines face to face interactions using cognitive learning, skills training, and experiential techniques to better understand and interact with others. Includes practice in personal application of communications principles.

COM 323 Business Communication 3 credits

Emphasis on methods needed for effective communication in the business environment. Includes interpersonal communication, oral and written reports, business letters and memos, proposal writing, and case study presentations.
Prerequisites: ENG 123 or 497 and COM 123 or 494.

COM 346 Politics, Gender and Race in the News 3 credits

The media represent categorical groups based on gender, race, religion or culture in various ways. This course focuses on the nature of such representations in particular media or across various media. While the course focuses on representations of one or more of the categorical groups delineated in the course title, the emphasis is on the manner and effects of such representations within a society.

COM 354 Interpersonal Conflict 3 credits

Analysis of the nature and function of interpersonal conflict. Identification of personal conflict styles as well as productive and destructive communication strategies.
For Deaf Studies participants only.

COM 373 Design and Visual Language 3 credits

This course helps students develop the intellectual skills necessary for analysis, understanding and creation of media messages in the many formats of today’s high-density visual environment. Students will be introduced to the syntax, grammar and rhetoric of visual communications. The course also surveys current trends in interactive media, marketing and advertising on the Internet and various forms of e-commerce. Assignments explore information architecture and how visual design, writing style and navigation logic affect interactive marketing success.
Prerequisites: COM 163 and DIG 263.

COM 403Social Media Management I3 credits

This course will introduce principles of social media management, including social media planning, content development, insights and analysis. Students will explore current platforms and tools, as well as how to craft effective social media strategies. Communication and public relations theories and techniques will be explored through case studies and real-world application.

COM 413Social Media Management II3 credits

This course builds on the concepts introduced in Social Media Management I, implementing techniques to skills including setting goals, crisis management, and customer service. Emphasis will be placed on the psychology of social media, community engagement and management, as well as multimedia as online interaction. Students will apply branding strategies and corporate narrative to a variety of projects.

COM 436 Small Group & Organizational Communication 3 credits

Theory, research, and practice related to the structure and functioning of groups, including leadership, decision making, and variable requisites to effective communication. Combines theory and practice to develop an awareness of group dynamics and employs small groups in the processes of information seeking and problem solving. Also includes a study of communication in organizations and practical application through the assessment and identification of communication problems in organizations.

COM 454 Crisis Communication and Media Relations 3 credits

Analysis of corporate, institutional and governmental conflict and crises. Consideration given to nature of social conflict, negotiation, problem-solving, crisis planning, news conferences and press releases.

COM 483 Digital Media Internship 3-6 credits

An internship is designed to allow upper-level students to experience the professional world while they are still involved in their academic training. This provides them with both an understanding of the relationship of their academic preparation to their career aspirations and the demands that will be placed upon them in the professional world. An internship is limited to 3 credit hours. However, a maximum of 6 internship credits may be applied to the major of they represent two distinctly different internship experiences. The internship typically occurs during the student’s last year.
Prerequisites: COM 163, DIG 263, DIG 313.

COM 491-3 Topics in Communications 1-3 credits

Special topics of varied interest are offered as needed and as resources permit.

COM 494 Honors Debates 3 credits

This course will examine contemporary debates in science and religion including the scientific, theological, ethical and philosophical aspect of the issues debated. Issues will be researched through a process of analysis, definition, both inductive and deductive reasoning. A debate thesis will be articulated and argued by means of in-class persuasive speeches and debates.

Christian Education

CRE 113 Introduction to Christian Education 3 credits

This course offers an explanation of historical and philosophical foundations for church education. It provides an overview of the Christian education ministry to all ages in the local church, and explores such topics as materials and teaching methods, curriculum instruction and evaluation, leadership and training, the recruitment and supervision of volunteers, etc.

CRE 153 Children’s Ministries 3 credits

A specialized study of developing and evaluating children’s ministries and resources as it pertains to specific programs such as Bible clubs, Kid’s Crusades, children’s church, music, drama, and other children’s activities.

CRE 223 Technology in Children’s 3 credits

Ministries A study of the philosophy for and pragmatics of contemporary usage of technology within children’s ministry. Exemplary examples of technology integration within the local children’s ministry setting will be explored and common software applications will be utilized to create technological tools to enhance ministry to children.

CRE 233 Puppetry 3 credits

A practical course designed to give the student a working knowledge of the creative art of puppetry. Includes techniques for making and using puppets, puppet staging, writing puppet scripts, and administering a puppetry ministry. Students will be involved in puppet productions designed to reach children with biblical truth. Practical field experience will be required. $45 lab fee.

CRE 333 Methods and Principles of Teaching 3 credits

An in-depth study of the teaching-learning process with primary emphasis on creative, effective methods to develop quality teaching.

CRE 342 Small Group Ministries 3 credits

Presents methods for establishing small group ministries within the local church. This course covers the dynamics of small group interaction; developing fellowship, support and outreach groups; and skills in organization and leadership.

CRE 383 Adult Education Ministry 3 credits

An overview of needs, opportunities, and resources for education of adults in the church. Theories of andragogy, adult faith development, continuing education, and specialized ministry to young, middle, and older adults, as well as special-needs groups will be explored.

CRE 393 Children’s Presentations 3 credits

An overview of needs, opportunities, and resources for education of adults in the church. Theories of andragogy, adult faith development, continuing education, and specialized ministry to young, middle, and older adults, as well as special-needs groups will be explored.

CRE 422 Leading Missions Trips, Camps & Retreats 3 credits

Two of the most powerful tools for shaping lives are mission’s trips and camps/retreats. This course is an interactive study on the philosophy, objectives, and administration of these tools. Three key phases preparation, outreach, and debriefing – will all be addressed to maximize discipleship opportunities. Training of leadership, budgeting, promotion, and organizational principles will be covered. Additional fees may be charged for using off-campus facilities.

CRE 491-3 Topics in Christian Education 1-3 credits

Special topics of varied interest are offered as needed and as resources permit.

Christian Life

CRL 002 Individual Mentored Academic Program (iMAP) Non-Credit

An introduction to the collegiate experience with emphasis on skills necessary for academic success. Topics will cover time management, reading, memorization, note taking, test taking, and library usage. Contemporary issues of campus life also will be explored. Offered on a Pass/Fail basis. Lab work session required. Does not fulfill General Education credit requirements. See Academic Guidance for more information.

CRL 020 The Forge Way Non-Credit

The Forge Way offers freshmen and other new students the opportunity to join a learning and relationship-building group to help students make an enjoyable and successful transition to college life. Includes orientation on mission and values of VFCC.

CRL/ICS 223 Developing Outreach and Discipleship Programs 3 credits

A study of the total church program of evangelism and follow-up ministry. Provides a theoretical and practical basis for the establishment of outreach and discipleship programs in the church. Evaluates the philosophy and design of several established programs.

CRL 233 Evangelizing Children 3 credits

This course is an in-depth focus on evangelism and children. Topics include: the history of child evangelism in America, traditional as well as cutting edge evangelism thrusts, age-appropriate evangelism techniques, how to lead a child to Christ, the art of the altar call, making the most of holidays, preparation of child evangelism materials, and how to organize and present evangelistic events for children. This class will require students to prepare and execute a plan for child evangelism, write, and illustrate an age- appropriate Gospel tract, and participate in several evangelistic programs in local churches. Some time outside of the class will be required as we present the Gospel to children in a variety of venues.

CRL 243 Developing Strategic Outreaches 3 credits

A practical study of outreach strategies with special attention to awareness of specific people groups, interface with community organizations, prayer, out-reach designing, team building, financial issues, follow up, and evaluation. Fieldwork will be an integral part of this course.

CRL 413 Leading with Integrity and Skill 3 credits

A seminar course that explores contemporary concepts of leadership and enduring biblical values.

CRL 493 Principles of Residence Leadership 3 credits

The course is designed to provide future Resident Assistants with a foundation and understanding of VFCC's Residence Life program and to train and equip the RAs for their leadership role the following year.

Digital Media

DIG 201 Introduction to Video Production 1 credit

This course will cover basic video production from concept to completion. Emphasis will be placed on fundamental technical skills as well as a working knowledge of video acquisition and editing. Students will learn basic camera, capturing, editing, and media creation techniques.

DIG 231 Sports Broadcasting I 3 credits

Study of sports broadcasting by means of integrating the knowledge and practice acquired through other Digital Media & Communication classes (such as Digital Design, Video I & II, Digital Audio, Marketing & Public Relation, etc). This class will be used to develop each student’s knowledge and skill set in various areas of Digital Media & Communication by implementing each skill set into a sports broadcast. (BSA)
Prerequisite: COM 231.

DIG 243 Introduction to Photography 3 credit

An in-depth look at digital photography and using the An introduction to digital photography and using the photograph as a means of expression. This course emphasizes the camera as a tool for seeing, under-standing imagery, and composing. Students will demonstrate familiarity with core concepts in the areas of camera use, lighting techniques, as well as proficiency in photographic retouching and output.
Prerequisite: Computer and internet proficiency.

DIG 251 Introduction to Presentation Graphics 1 credit

An introduction to creation, formatting, and real-time implementation of presentation graphics. Students will learn the basics of presentation design, procedures in digital presentation software programs, and techniques for presenting visual stories.

DIG 252 Sports Broadcasting II 3 credits

Study of sports broadcasting by means of integrating the knowledge and practice acquired through other Digital Media & Communication classes (such as Digital Design, Video I & II, Digital Audio, Marketing & Public Relation, etc). This class will be build on DIG 231 and used to develop each student’s knowledge and skill set in various areas of Digital Media & Communication by implementing each skill set into a sports broadcast. (BSA)
Prerequisite: Dig 231.

DIG 261 Desktop Publishing 1 credit

An introduction to techniques for layout, typography, editing, formatting, and publishing of various documents. Includes a review of software programs.

DIG 263 Digital Design 3 credit

An introduction to techniques for layout, design,typography, editing, formatting, and publishing of various documents. Course also introduces students to graphic design as a conceptual and visual discipline. Projects focus on solving visual problems from a wide range of topics in a variety of media. Includes a review of software programs.
Prerequisite: COM 163. Course requires purchase of Adobe Creative Cloud software.

DIG 272 Intro to Web Design 3 credit

An introduction to basic Web page design that focuses on freely available tools and techniques. Students learn fundamental techniques, customizing and maintaining their own Web presence. Topics include: HTML formatting, hyperlink integration, and an introduction to Web graphic design.

DIG 273 Web Design and Implementation 3 credit

An in-depth look at designing and coding Web pages and sites. Students will learn front-end development and back-end structures by learning to develop CSS, PHP, HTML, and AJAX through such software programs as Adobe Dreamweaver. Topics include: Site navigation, Content Management Systems, and legal and ethical issues.
Prerequisites: DIG 263, DIG 272.

DIG 303 Video Production and Technology I 3 credit

This course will cover basic video production from concept to completion. Emphasis will be placed on fundamental technical skills as well as working knowledge of professional video editing software suites. Students will learn basic camera, capturing, editing, and media creation techniques.
Prerequisite: COM 163.

DIG 311 Advanced Presentation Techniques 1 credit

Integration of multimedia, animation, narration, advanced techniques for sound files, transitions, interactive presentations, customization, multiple screen projection and other advanced presentation techniques.
Prerequisite: DIG 251 or Approval of the Instructor.

DIG 313 Video Production and Technology II 3 credit

This course will expand on the skills and concepts introduced in DIG 303. The students will be joined in teams to complete a variety of projects relative to course objectives. Students will demonstrate familiarity with core concepts in the areas of camera and lighting techniques, as well as proficiency in non-linear editing. Using new production techniques, students will concentrate on the creative and technical aspects of planning, shooting, and editing a video based on a personal vision. Students will produce projects in a variety of genres.
Prerequisite: DIG 303.

DIG 321 Webcasting, Streaming and Podcasting 1 credit

Introduction to fundamentals of podcasting audio programs, and online webcasting and streaming on-demand audio and video. Students will produce a podcast and will be responsible for all production processes. They will assist in production responsibilities for the college’s daily chapel webcast. Course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisite: COM 163.

DIG 344 Photography and Convergent Journalism 3 credit

This course will assist students in development of photographic skills including capturing real-life moments from their unique personal viewpoint. Students will learn to discern quality and content of their photographs while maintaining their voice. Emphasis will be placed on photography for photojournalism intended for convergence across media. Students will be challenged to produce work suitable for structural, information gathering, and presentation convergence.
Prerequisite: DIG 243.

DIG 345 Studio Photography 3 credit

This course explores the creative and technical aspects of studio photography, including basic principles and application of light in the creation of photographs. Topics covered include techniques in the areas of professional portraiture, product photography, and exploration of themes bound by concept, subject, and technique.

DIG 363 Motion Graphics & Media Deployment 3 credit

A study of motion graphics and animation with topics that include timeline development, basic scripting, graphic communication, aesthetics, and other subjects related to motion graphic productions. The course also includes a survey of various software, DVD authoring, and video compression techniques.
Prerequisite: DIG 303.

DIG 385 Video Systems and Engineering 3 credit

An in-depth study of technical systems, formats, and troubleshooting video equipment. Students will learn how to budget, design, and implement video systems for various applications and scenarios. Students will also develop a working knowledge of vector scopes, waveform monitors, cameras, lights, file formats, format conversion devices, and editing workflows.

DIG 426 Experimental Video 3 credit

An advanced workshop to develop projects in experimental, documentary, or narrative forms using portable video and editing facilities. Course will examine structures of sound, color, visual emotion, and creative editing while exploring study, design, production, and implementation of hypermedia projects including interactive and computer-controlled video and other emerging technologies.
Prerequisites: DIG 303 and DIG 313.

DIG 431 Directing and Producing for Live Broadcast 3 credit

This course helps students develop skills using technical storytelling tools and personnel management techniques. Emphasis will be placed on coaching and directing teams, as well as basic systems and organizational structures. Course topics will also include time budgeting, resource management, and working under pressure.

DIG 432 Senior Video Portfolio 3 credit

As an independent and in-depth exploration of advanced video production techniques, this course is designed for the student to demonstrate professional competence and creativity in video production. Students will develop a cohesive body of work while refining their technical skills. Students in the Video Production concentration must take this course after successfully completing all required video-related coursework.

DIG 441 Senior Photography Seminar 3 credit

A course designed to help students become more conversant about issues and opportunities in pho-zoography. Topics include, but are not limited to: international photojournalism, ethics, technical developments, and alternative techniques. Projects throughout the course reinforce class content through practical application.

DIG 442 Senior Photography Portfolio 3 credit

As an independent and in-depth exploration of advanced photography techniques, this course is designed for the student to demonstrate professional competence and creativity in photography. Students will develop a cohesive body of work while refining their technical skills. Students in the Photography concentration must take this course after successfully completing all required video-related coursework.

Early Childhood

ECE 123 Foundations, Principles, and Practices of Early Childhood Education 3 credit

This course examines current philosophies in the field of Early Childhood Education, the tension created by opposing philosophies, and how adherence to these philosophies is translated into educational principles and practices. The relationship between play and learning will be explored. Integration of curriculum into the learning experience in a developmentally appropriate environment will be stressed.

ECE 204 Methods and Materials 3 credit

These courses focus on developing an integrated curriculum based on the socio-emotional, sensor motor and cognitive skills of the 0-8 year-old child. Emphasis will be on providing an integrated, hands-on learning environment that parallels the maturation of the young child. Students will gain experience in lesson planning and practical use of curriculum materials. The courses will include classroom observations and field work.
Prerequisites: ECE 123 and EDU 103.

ECE 466 Student Teaching 12 credit

Practical teaching experience in area schools giving the student opportunities to practice many facets of education by working with small groups and in regular classroom assignments. Placements will be made for the student’s final semester. ECE 466 Student Teaching must be taken concurrently with ECE 471 Student Teaching Seminar. Please see Other Charges (page 20) for Student Teaching fee information.
Prerequisites: ALL academic work completed.

ECE 471 Student Teaching Seminar 1 credit

Small group interaction with student teaching supervisor to review experiences of the student teaching placements.
Must be taken concurrently with ECE 466.

Education

EDU 103 Child Development 3 credit

This course examines the physical, intellectual, emotional, social, and spiritual development of the child from early childhood through adolescence, including the study of how children/adolescents learn and acquire knowledge. Special attention will be given to leading theories of development and their implications in educational settings.

EDU 113 Adolescent Development 3 credit

This course examines the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to the adolescent’s cognitive, social, sexual, emotional, and moral development. Through course readings, class discussions, and student assignments, students will apply knowledge of adolescent development to professional settings in the U.S. (i.e., school, classroom, NGO, and/ or church).

EDU 263 Principles of Adolescent Education 3 credit

A study of the social, philosophical, and historical foundations of education with special emphasis on the application to contemporary educational settings and issues. The course requires a practicum and a practicum journal.

EDU 285 The Writing Process 3 credit

A course in the basics of English grammar and mechanics for the middle/secondary level education major. The writing process, paragraph and essay structure journals, portfolios, and writing domains are examined. This course includes methodology for teaching writing and the writing workshop approach.
Prerequisites: ENG 123 or 497, EDU 263, and PSY283 or EDU 103.

EDU 333 Integrating the Related Arts 3 credit

This course offers an exploration of the integration of the creative arts in an elementary school setting. Special emphases will be given to the areas of art, music, and creative dramatics and on how to integrate skills and activities in these areas into the elementary curriculum. A hands-on, thematic approach will be explored and adaptations for teaching the exceptional child, including the gifted, will be included.
Prerequisites: ECE 123 or EDU 263, and FNA 113.

EDU 340 Methods of Teaching ELL 3 credit

A course designed to prepare students to teach English language learners in ESL classes and in mainstream content area classes in public and private schools in the United States and to teach ELL in a foreign country. Included are theories of second language acquisition, program models for ELLs, curriculum development, and lesson planning using variety of methods to integrate the teaching of English listening, speaking, conversation, pronunciation, and grammar, vocabulary, reading and writing with content area objectives.
Prerequisites: EDU 103, ECE 123 OR EDU 263, CMS 233.

EDU 353 Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School 3 credit

An analysis of the content, scope and sequence, trends, materials, and skills integral to the various social science disciplines found in elementary social studies. The course is process oriented and focuses on gathering, organizing, reporting, and interpreting social science data in hands-on activities. Thematic and/or integrated units of study are emphasized. Units on Pennsylvania history and physical and cultural geography are also studied.
Prerequisites: CMS 233, History requirement, ECE 123 or EDU 263, EDU 103.

EDU 363 Teaching Science and Health in the Elementary School 3 credit

This course introduces students to how to teach science and health via an inquiry approach. Students will learn questioning strategies for inquiry instruction and how to plan multidisciplinary units that meet the needs of diverse learners and that address state and national standards. Strategies for integrating technology into science and health will be explored.
Prerequisites: CMS 233 and at least one science course with accompanying lab.

EDU 373 Language and Literacy Development 3 credit

This is an exploratory course investigating language acquisition, learning theories, the reading process, and their relation to the teaching of reading. The relationship between language development and emergent literacy, language models, communication and listening competencies, and the effect of a print-rich environment will be emphasized. Study will include the teaching of reading and language skills to elementary school-aged children, with an emphasis on listening, speaking, reading and writing development. Various approaches to teaching reading will be explored such as the use of phonics, basal readers, guided reading, balanced literacy, and reading workshop.
Prerequisites: CMS 233, EDU 263, EDU 103.

EDU 383 Field Experience .5 credit

The aim of the field experience program at Valley Forge Christian College is to provide education students with a progression of opportunities to apply theory to practice in an authentic educational setting. During the two semesters prior to student teaching, students spend one full day or two half days per week (secondary education only) in a local P-12 classroom at a grade level appropriate for their certification. The VFCC Field Experience Coordinator secures all field experience placements. Every education student at VFCC, regardless of the certification program, takes EDU 383. Students are concurrently registered for specific methods courses required for their degree program have assignments related to the field experience.

EDU 413 Multicultural Education 3 credit

This course explores what it means to be an effective teacher in a society that is increasingly diverse. We will focus on the skills and dispositions teachers need to provide high quality instruction for all students, regardless of their class, race, ethnicity, gender, or religion.
Prerequisites: EDU 103, EDU 263 or ECE 123.

EDU 423 Differentiated Reading Instruction 3 credit

This course is designed to help develop an understanding of, and plan instruction for those students with varying levels of ability and developmental need. A variety of assessment procedures, strategies and techniques for teaching reading, as well as remedial programs will be examined as a means to differentiate and teach reading to these different levels. Students will learn to tailor instruction and remediate minor reading problems identified through assessment. An emphasis will be placed on reading in the content areas where many of these difficulties present themselves. This course includes a related Field Experience.
Prerequisites: CMS 233, ECE 373, ECE 123 or EDU 263, EDU 103.

EDU 433 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School 3 credit

This course is designed to prepare students to use problem-solving approach to effectively teach elementary mathematics. Students will learn to plan and assess lessons that are developmentally appropriate and that address state and national content and process standards. Topics include: lesson and unit planning, appropriate use of technology, state and national standards, assessment, mathematics/literature connections, and meeting needs of diverse learners.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of MTH 133 and MTH 233.

EDU 443 Classroom Management 3 credit

This course is an overview of various strategies related to classroom instruction. Topics include effective teaching strategies, generation of classroom rules and procedures, maintaining appropriate student behavior, and strengthening communication skills. Note: This is a senior level practicum course designed to be taken just prior to the student teaching experience. All lower level education courses should be completed before taking this course.
Prerequisites: EDU 103, EDU 263, CMS 233.

EDU 453 Assessment and Measurement 3 credit

This is an introductory overview of the policies and procedures used in the measurement and assessment of educational performance. This course provides the foundation of basic measurement concepts as well as hands-on experience with assessment tools. The primary focus of the course is on measurement and assessment strategies for all learners including the use of standardized, informal, and curriculum-based procedures. Attention is also given to the diagnosis and program planning of students with exceptional learning needs. The field experience portion of this course is designed to provide students with school-based experiences relevant to academic assessment methods and procedures of all learners.
Prerequisites: all methods courses.

EDU 466 Student Teaching 12 credit

Practical teaching experience in area schools giving the student opportunities to practice many facets of education by working with small groups and in regular classroom assignments. Placements will be made for the student’s final semester. EDU 466 Student Teaching must be taken concurrently with EDU 471 Student Teaching Seminar. Please see Other Charges (page 20) for Student Teaching fee information.
Prerequisites: ALL academic work completed.

EDU 471 Student Teaching Seminar 1 credit

Small group interaction with student teaching supervisor to review experiences of the student teaching placements. Must be taken concurrently with EDU 466.

EDU 491 Topics in Educational Foundations1-3 credit

Special topics of interest are offered as needed and as resources permit.

English

ENG 013 English as a Second Language 3 credits

This course prepares the student to meet the demands of ENG 123. The course emphasizes writing effective expository prose with stress upon the writing process. Focus, content, organization, style, and conventions are practiced within the context of student writings. Placement determined by SAT score.
A passing grade of C- or higher is required. Does not count toward General Education credits needed for graduation.

ENG 103 Introduction to College Composition 3 credits

This course prepares the student to meet the demands of ENG 123. The course emphasizes writing effective expository prose with stress upon the writing process. Focus, content, organization, style, and conventions are practiced within the context of student writings. Placement determined by SAT score.
A passing grade of C- or higher is required. Does not count toward General Education credits needed for graduation.

ENG 123 College Writing and Research 3 credits

This course stresses the writing process and intro-dukes the skills necessary to conduct college-level research. Emphasis is placed on argumentative and analytical writing supported by research.
A passing grade of C- or higher is required.

ENG 223 Creative Writing 3 credits

Structured as a writing workshop, this course encourages students to develop a personal writing style and voice through experimentation with writing short stories, drama, and poetry. Skill in revising and marketing are taught.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

ENG 313 Journalism 3 credits

An emphasis on the practical application of writing skills. News stories, reporting techniques, feature writing; editing, photojournalism and layout will be studied. Principles of journalism are applied specifically to church promotion.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

ENG 333 Writing for the Media 3 credits

This course will introduce students to various types of mass media writing -- print and broadcast journalism, public relations, advertising and online media. It will develop skills in information gathering, interviewing, organizing, writing and revising media writing and in judging the quality of current media writing. Students will learn how to create a weblog or online “blog” and become an expert in a niche field. The class will teach students to look at a news story and determine the best media to represent it.
Prerequisites: ENG 123 or ENG 497 and ENG 223 or ENG 313.

ENG 423 Advanced Creative Writing 3 credits

This course encourages students to develop their personal writing style and voice by writing short stories, poetry and literary essays at an advanced level. The class is structured as a writing workshop in which students present their work to their classmates and constructively critique each others’ work as part of the revision process. Marketing skills are also taught. Students must submit a selection of their choice to a publisher of a literary magazine.
Prerequisites: ENG 123 and 223.

ENG 497 Honors Film and Culture 3 credits

This seminar considers film as a distinct art form and as a mediator of ideas about faith, values and behavior to the viewing public. It explores the way classic and contemporary movies treat, evade and mythologize the nature of gender, race, class, and faith in American society. The course requires intensive research and writing about the relationship between film and culture. Placement determined by SAT score

Family Studies

FSP 273Familey Studies Practicum: Observation 2 credits

This phase of the Family Studies practicum sequence provides a supervised experience in an approved family services setting. Observation is the first of three practicums that provide the learner with a deeper understanding the real-world application of family studies in the market place or non-profit arenas. Students will achieve this understanding through required readings, meetings with the supervisory professor and observations of the field supervisor in professional settings.

FSP 373Familey Studies Practicum: Immersion 3 credits

This phase of the practicum sequence moves students beyond the observation stage to a more hands on approach. Students will be required learn from and volunteer with a family service professional. Required readings, classroom knowledge, and interaction with a supervisory professor are required. Professional identity and the foundational skills for family service will be developed.
Prerequisite: FSP 273.

FSP 373Familey Studies Practicum: Internship 3 credits

This phase of the practicum sequence provides a supervised experience in direct service with families in the community or church. All internships must be approved and processed through the Internship office. Students are required to complete practical fieldwork in addition to written work. A field supervisor will assess student performance during the internship. Internships hours will be served throughout the course of a semester. A comprehensive journal is required that addresses the student’s activities during the internship and issues of development in their area of ministry. Internships are designed to address the student’s focus of development and future plans.
Prerequisites: FSP 273 and FSP 373.

Fine Arts

FNA 112 Music Appreciation 3 credits

An introductory course in music featuring significant musical compositions of various styles and musical periods. Composers of note in Western music from the Baroque, Classical, Romantic and the 20th century will be studied as a basis for intelligent listening habits for lifelong appreciation. Additional study in global music will be presented for a more multicultural view of the art of music and its place in human culture. Assigned listening and concert attendance.

FNA 113 Fine Arts Appreciation 3 credits

This course is designed to develop and expand an appreciation for music, art, and aesthetics. Introduces major movements and ideas in art, music, and architecture. Examines historical time periods and major figures including their philosophy, style, and view of aesthetics. Requires participation in cultural excursions.

FNA 123 Ceramics I: Basic Techniques 3 credits

Covers the fundamental methods of creating both functional and non-functional clay forms using hand-building techniques as well as basic glazing and kiln firings.
$100 Lab fee.

FNA 133 Ceramics II: Intermediate Techniques 3 credits

Students will continue to progress in hand-building technique, as well as try their hand at the potter’s wheel. Elementary throwing skills will be practiced, with a limited number of thrown pieces required. Hand-built pieces will be more decorative, with both coil and slab work added to each individual project.
Prerequisite: FNA 123. $100 Lab fee.

FNA 143 Quilting Arts 3 credits

The student will study quilting as an art form as well as the history of its development in American culture. The student will acquire skills to operate a sewing machine and construct a sampler quilt, which includes mastering different quilt block types that will enable them to learn to execute many different styles based on these fundamental types.
Lab fee $20.00.

FNA 213 Introduction to Drama 3 credits

This course is designed to give the student an under-standing and appreciation for drama through exam-inning the nature of drama, drama history (including religious drama history) as it relates to world cultures and values, and an overview of dramatic literature-including a look at the contemporary world theater. Opportunities for practical application are made available for individual growth and encouragement of creativity.

FNA 494 Honors Fine Arts Appreciation 3 credits

This limited enrollment, honors seminar is a journey of, exploration in, and encounter with artistic beauty (technically: aesthetics) and its expressions in music, painting, sculpture, architecture, dance, and related disciplines of the beaux-arts. Philosophical, theological, mathematical, historical, biographical, psychological, sociological, financial, legal, and other metaperspectives are entertained. Intensive, individual presented research in the arts and participation in cultural excursions are required opportunities.

History

HIS 213 Ancient and Medieval World History 3 credits

A survey of world civilization from the beginning of civilization to the Renaissance. Special attention is given to major events, individual, and the cultural contributions of each civilization.

HIS 223 Modern and Contemporary World History  3 credits

A survey of world civilization from the Enlightenment to the present. Special attention is given to major events, individual, and the cultural contributions of each civilization.

HIS 233 U.S. History – Colonization to Reconstruction 3 credits

A survey of the major events and individuals in United States history from Colonization to Reconstruction. Critically examines various topics of interpretive interest in American history such as the coming of the coming of the Europeans, Puritanism, religious freedom, the Revolution, slavery, immigration, industrialization, urbanization, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.

HIS 243 U.S. History – Reconstruction to the Present 3 credits

A survey of the major events and individuals in United States history from just after Reconstruction to the present. Critically examines various topics of interpretive interest in American history such as immigration, industrialization, urbanization, the rise of Big Business, Imperialism, the New Deal, the Cold War, Vietnam, the Civil Rights Movement, etc.

HIS 245 History of the American Deaf Community 3 credits

This course provides an understanding of the culture of the Deaf in American society. The traits, values, institutions and worldview of the Deaf will be discussed.
For Deaf Studies participants only.

HIS 373 Ancient and Medieval Christian History 3 credits

A survey of Christianity from the post-apostolic Church through 1500 A.D. Emphasis is placed on major events, individuals, and developments in historical theology. Special topics include persecution, heresies, monasticism, and the development of the institutions of the Church.

HIS 383 Modern and Contemporary Christian History 3 credits

A survey of Christianity from 1500 AD to the present. Emphasis is placed on major events, individuals, and developments in historical theology. Special topics include the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, evangelization of the Western Hemisphere, Puritanism, the development of denominations, revivalism, fundamentalism, the rise of theological liberalism, Vatican II, and the 20th Century Pentecostal and Charismatic movements.

HIS 480 Honors United States History Since 1945 3 credits

A survey of the major events and individuals in United States history from the end of World War II to the present. Critically examines the presidencies and major themes of interpretive interest in American history such as the Cold War, the Civil Rights movement, Vietnam, Watergate, the counter culture movement, religion, feminism, etc.

HIS 491-3 Topics in History 1-3 credits

Special topics of varied interest are offered as needed and as resources permit.

HIS 494 Honors U.S. History Problems and Issues 3 credits

An analysis of major issues in America from the Colonial period to the Reconstruction era, including colonization and the suppression of native cultures, the relationship of Church and State, the restructuring of the relationship between America and Britain, slavery, secession, etc.

HIS 499 Honors Italian Civilization: Ancient Rome to the Present 3 credits

An introduction to Italian history, culture, and society from ancient Rome to the present with a particular focus on preparing students for the travel component to Italy by giving them a social and historical context related to the various sites to be visited and topics to be discussed. Various topics will be examined including but not limited to the Roman Republic, Roman Empire, Papal Italy, the Renaissance, the Risorgimento, Fascism, and Italy in the European Union.

Intercultural Studies

ICS 142 Cultural Anthropology 3 credits

This course will introduce students to the heart of human culture in its diverse, traditional and changing beliefs, values, behavior and economics. Key persons and trends will be studied through classes, assignments, overview of modern mission history, and personal interaction with people who apply anthropo- logical principles to cross-cultural service.

ICS 209 Spiritual Encounters 3 credits

This course examines the principles and dynamics of spiritual conflict. Issues include theological reflection, cultural analysis, and pragmatic considerations such as spiritual discipline and the implications for mission strategies. The course includes a biblical examination of the principles of spiritual warfare, intercession, and the gifts of the Holy Spirit.

ICS/CRL 223 Outreach and Discipleship Programs 3 credits

A study of the total church program of evangelism and follow-up ministry. Provides a theoretical and practical basis for the establishment of outreach and discipleship programs in the church. Evaluates the philosophy and design of several established programs.

ICS 299 Travel Seminar 1-3 credits

This course combines country and cultural research, personal and team preparation, international experience and a concluding reflection. The student will apply theory taught in the classroom setting through tangible experience.

ICS 303 Approaches to Islam 1-3 credits

A survey of Christian approaches to Islamic peoples. Study will include the theological, contextual, and practical approaches. Key issues such as proper attitudes, spiritual warfare, servant hood, sensitivity to culture, and appropriate use of scripture will be explored. Student will learn new and effective methods of engaging Muslims in effective relationship and witness.

ICS 322 Area Studies 2 credits

A survey of a particular geographic area of the world with its cultural, historical, socioeconomic, political and religious distinctions. The focus is on strategies for intercultural ministry. Geographic areas of study vary: Asia, Eastern and Western Europe, Northern Africa and the Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, Oceania. May be repeated depending on content.

ICS 323 Folk Islam/Power Encounters 3 credits

Study of the beliefs, practices, animistic roots and localized expressions of popular Islam. The course will illustrate the spiritism and folk religion blended into the faith of most of the world’s Muslim people groups. The worldview of Folk Muslims is taken into account in developing strategies for effective ministry to Muslims.

ICS 325 Apologetics for Islam 3 credits

This course will involve an examination of the theological challenge of Islam and the Christian response. Key theological differences will be studied with special emphasis being placed upon biblical answers that communicate the gospel of Christ to Muslims.

ICS 330 Planting Churches in Muslim Context 3 credits

A survey of the major ecclesiological options and their development. Principles for establishing evangelism and discipline ministries in Muslim contexts will be explored. Special attention will be given to the unique process of establishing the church in an Islamic context.

ICS 335 Creative Entry Strategies in Muslim Context 3 credits

This course looks at new and creative entry strategies into restrictive access Muslim countries. The place of business as missions will look at trading companies, coffee and tea houses etc. Other options included will be relief and development work and ESL.

ICS 338Critiical Issues in Urban Context 3 credits

An overview and analysis of the urban context, with attention given to the biblical theology of mission to the city. Old Testament and New Testament themes are explored.

ICS 343 The Holy Spirit and Missions 3 credits

This course explores the dynamics of the Holy Spirit and mission in relation to biblical, personal, historical, cultural, contextual and functional dimensions. Students are encouraged to explore their personal mission philosophy regarding the Holy Spirit’s role in ministry.

ICS 345 Women in Islam 3 credits

This course examines the identity and role of women in historic and contemporary Islam. Muslim women and children identified as a people group sub-category that requires a distinct and sensitive ministry approach. Includes the role of Muslim women as taught by Qur’an and Hadith in various Muslim cultures.

ICS 373 Field Work 3 credits

This course to be taken in the Junior year is a self- guided research project. The student will choose a subject within the framework of Intercultural Studies with the professor’s approval. The course integrates research, documentation and experience in the chosen project/focus.

ICS 421Pastoral Theology of the Urban Church 3 credits

Examines how Christian beliefs and institutions have been shaped by and help to direct community life within urban locations. Course content focuses on current methods and skills of urban church ministry, community organizing, and social change within a city. Consideration is given to different strategies used to serve a local neighborhood.
Course fee $175.

ICS 453 Church Planting & Revitalization Bootcamp 3 credits

The student will participate in an Assemblies of God or other approved church planting “Bootcamp” (typically a one week intensive) in a District of the student’s choice. The experience includes: assessment of giftings, temperaments, practical living, healthy ministry habits, and essential components and steps for planting a new church, etc. Pre- and post-class work will be required.

ICS 456 Urban Evangelism and Church Planting 3 credits

Strategies for evangelism and church development are examined and applied through case studies, field trips, contacts with resource persons, and student- led projects. The course will incorporate practical application of evangelism and church planting in the urban context.
Course fee $175.

ICS 471 Internship Seminar 2 credits

This course is to prepare the student for his/her internship. Emphasis will be placed upon self understanding, conflict resolution, and the practical concerns faced by interns. Time will also be given to formalize the specifics for each internship.
This course is a Prerequisite for ICS 481.

ICS 481 Internship 1-3 credits

This internship provides a supervised experience in learning and ministering intercultural. Internships are tailored according to the student’s major. One academic credit will be given for each month of successful completion of 75 hours of field work.
Prerequisite: ICS 471.

ICS 483 Urban Internship 6 credits

One semester internship and training/mentoring in the urban ministry context and related social service opportunities.
Course taught at the Urban Center.

ICS 485 Capstone 3 credits

A capstone paper that evaluates and integrates the totality of the student’s studies and experience.

ICS 491-3 Topics in Intercultural Ministry 1-3 credits

Special topics of varied interest are offered as needed and as resources permit.

ICS 498 Independent Study 3 credits

Directed reading and research during the student’s urban study experience. Topics are individually designed according to student interest and in consultation with instructor.

Literature

LIT 203 Understanding and Appreciating Poetry 3 credits

This course will focus on the study of poetry as an art form, literary genre, and medium for personal expression. Students will develop skills necessary for reading, analyzing, and understanding poetry while examining the works of renowned poets.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 213 Science Fiction Literature 3 credits

A scholarly evaluation of science fiction and fantasy fiction written by classic and contemporary writers with the goal of illustrating how theology, feminism, multicultural and ethnic issues, and other serious topics can be woven into this genre which is sometimes dismissed as mere entertainment.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 243 English Literature 3 credits

A critical and historical study of selected English literature from the fifth century to the present. Representative authors from each period are selected so that students may gain an appreciation for outstanding authors and an understanding of the society in which each lived.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 244 Chaucer and Medieval Literature 3 credits

An examination of the writings of Geoffrey Chaucer, specifically The Canterbury Tales, in the context of history, language, and culture of Chaucer’s 14th century England. This course will reference other authors of the period.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or ENG 497

LIT 253 American Literature I 3 credits

A study of the major writers, works, and movements from the discovery of the New World to the Civil War, with an emphasis on literature that reflects diverse cultures such as Native, African-, Asian-, and Hispanic-American.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 254 American Literature II 3 credits

A study of the major writers, works, and movements from the Civil War to the Postmodern period, with an emphasis on literature that reflects diverse cultures such as Native, African-, Asian-, and Hispanic-American.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 255 African-American Literature 3 credits

A study of American life and thought as expressed in African-American literature. Representative authors are studied from the colonial period to the present. The values and variety of life in America are examined through analysis of this culture’s literature.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 265 Genres of Deaf Literature 3 credits

Three forms of Deaf literature are read and studied: fiction, drama, and poetry. Principle readings from each are highlighted, offering a wide range of stories of Deaf culture by classic modern writers/signers.
For Deaf Studies participants only.

LIT 273 Children’s Literature 3 credits

A survey of children’s literary classics. Students will learn to analyze and evaluate a wide range of children’s literature. In addition, the role of literature in children’s growth and development will be explored.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497, and EDU 103 or PSY 283.

LIT 291 Intro to Literary Criticism 3 credits

A study of literary theory and contemporary interpretive practices, including formalist, biographical, psychoanalytic, historical, structuralism, poststructuralist, sociological, Marxist, feminist, reader response, and deconstructionist.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 303 The Theology of C. S. Lewis 3 credits

This course explores the writing of C. S. Lewis, who insisted his works be judged by their literary merit and not only their theology. Themes of pain and suffering, the cultural relevance of Christianity, and biblical reflection in Lewis’s fiction and apologetics will be analyzed.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 325 Literature for Adolescents and Young Adults 3 credits

The course explores quality adolescent and young adult literature, censorship of adolescent and young adult literature, various approaches to reading adolescent and young adult literature, including reader response criticism, close reading strategies, and contemporary critical theories; the imagined reader(s) of young adult texts, and, by extension, the recent history of the cultural construction of the “teenager”; the application of cultural theories to analyses of adolescent and young adult literature as not only literary texts but also parallel cultural artifacts and mass-produced products; issues of multiculturalism, globalism, and diverse audiences and subject matter; and the relation of adolescent literature to “classic” adult literature.
Prerequisites: ENG 123 or 497, and EDU 113.

LIT 347 A Novel Conversion 3 credits

The course grapples with the fundamental questions of human experiences from a religious or spiritual perspective. Some Biblical works will be included; however, the focus will be on how religious ideas and concerns have informed an enormous diversity of literary productions drawn on a variety of traditions (including non-Western and non-monotheistic ones.)
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 353 Biblical Literature and its Contemporary Counterparts 3 credits

This course will offer students the opportunity to read widely among the various literatures of the Bible and its literary counterparts found in poetry, prose, and fiction. The course will attempt to explore and analyze the relationship between the sacred and the secular by using works from John Milton, C.S. Lewis, T.S. Eliot, George Herbert, William Shakespeare, Emily Dickinson, and several others. Several traditional as well as modern models of literary criticism will be considered.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 363 World Literature I 3 credits

A critical and historical study of masterpieces of world literature from the Ancient World, Middle Ages, and Renaissance.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 364 World Literature II 3 credits

A critical and historical study of masterpieces of world literature from the Enlightenment through the Postmodern period. The course includes Western and non-Western literature and deals with a variety of literary forms including poetry, drama, short stories, novellas, and non-fiction.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 371 Modern/Postmodern Novel 3 credits

A study of modern and postmodern novels on both sides of the Atlantic, emphasizing the distinctive way in which writers use style, structure, and technical experiment to express their views of the world. The significance of innovative literature techniques such as point of view, impressionism, stream of consciousness, and authorial impersonality will also be explored.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or ENG 497.

LIT 381 Major Author Studies 3 credits

Covers the life and selected works of one or more major writers such as Dickens, Hardy, Milton, Twain or Faulkner. Since the author(s) studied varies, this course may be taken more than once.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 383 Detective Literature 3 credits

A scholarly evaluation of multicultural detective fiction written by classic and contemporary writers with the goal of illustrating how theology, feminism, multicultural and ethnic issues, and other serious topics can be woven into this genre which is sometimes dismissed as mere entertainment.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 391 The Victorian Novel 3 credits

This is a study of the Victorian novel as a reflection of the period in which it is situated. The politics, mores, and worldview of the Victorians serve as the backdrop to the consideration of such major Victorian voices as Dickens, Hardy, Bronte, and Eliot.
Prerequisites: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 393 The Literature of Women 3 credits

A reading of women writers placed in their historical and literary contexts to explore issues such as the phases of a female literary tradition; the impact of sex and/or gender on literary themes and writing styles; and canon formation.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 433Shakespeare and His Contemporaries 3 credits

A study of Shakespeare’s tragedies, history plays, comedies, and romances, their distinctive features and cultural and historical context, with an emphasis on a critical analysis of the text and an appreciation of Shakespeare’s great artistry as a dramatist.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 491-3Topics of Literature1-3 credits

Special topics of varied interest are offered as needed and as resources permit.

LIT 495 Senior Seminar 3 credits

An intensive study of a literary topic, this course provides English majors the opportunity to demonstrate advanced research and writing skills. The seminar project includes an oral presentation to other majors and to the faculty of the English department. Students should choose a topic and faculty advisor a semester before enrolling in LIT 495.

LIT 498 Honors Theology of C.S. Lewis 3 credits

This course explores the writing of C. S. Lewis, who insisted his works be judged by their literary merit and not only their theology. Themes of pain and suffering, the cultural relevance of Christianity, and biblical reflection in Lewis’s fiction and apologetics will be examined.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or ENG 497.

Languages

LNG 203-33 Beginning French I – II 3 credits each

An introduction to the essential elements of spoken and written French with particular emphasis on oral proficiency, aural comprehension, and reading. French II is a continuation of French I.

LNG 213-23 Beginning American Sign Language I – II 3 credits each

A study of American Sign Language (ASL), learning the Language of Sign and a study of Deaf Culture. Lectures will include instruction in American Sign Language. It may also include such topics as psychosocial aspects of deafness, the history of Deaf people, and principles of the language. The method of teaching will include: silent and voiced lectures, student participation, practice, repetition, video tapes, book reading, written reports, guest lectures, games and independent Deaf culture experience.
LNG 213 is a Prerequisite for enrollment in LNG 223. Limited enrollment course.

LNG 240 Introduction to Biblical Languages 3 credits

An introduction to biblical languages including an overview of pronunciation, grammar and vocabulary of biblical Hebrew and Koine Greek. Emphasis is given to the function and use of the languages for biblical studies.

LNG 243-53 Beginning Greek I – II 3 credits each

An introduction to the basic elements of New Testament Greek, with emphasis upon grammatical forms, syntax, and vocabulary. Greek II is a continuation of Greek I and includes readings in the Greek New Testament.

LNG 263-73 Beginning Hebrews I – II 3 credits each

An introduction to the basic elements of Old Testament Hebrew, with emphasis upon basic vocabulary, syntax, and grammar. Hebrew II is a continuation of Hebrew I.

LNG 283-93 Beginning Spanish I – II 3 credits each

Essential element of Spanish grammar, pronunciation, simple conversation, reading, and composition. Spanish II is a continuation of Spanish I.

LNG 303-13 Intermed American Sign Language I – II 3 credits each

A continuation of a study of American Sign Language by signing sentences and hymns, and a survey of the subject of prelingual deafness. Lectures include topics such a psychosocial aspects of deafness, principles of idiomatic language of the deaf and religious education of the deaf. Intermediate I-II American Sign Language is a continuation of Beginning American Sign Language I-II. Limited enrollment course.
Prerequisite: LNG 213-23.

LNG 323-33 Intermed French I – II 3 credits each

Intensive training in conversation with additional practice in grammar, reading, and composition.
Prerequisite: LNG 233 or advanced placement.

LNG 343-53 Intermed Greek I – II 3 credits each

A study of advanced grammar with translation of selected New Testament passages. Greek II is an introduction to biblical exegesis with emphasis upon proper historical, contextual, and theological considerations. Exegetical studies will be made in selected portions of the New Testament. This course may be used a BIB/ NWT/OLT/THE elective.
Prerequisite: LNG 253. 

LNG 363-73 Intermed Hebrew I – II 3 credits each

Advanced study of Hebrew grammar with investigation into less common usages of Hebrew grammar as found in the Old Testament. Emphasis will be on improvement of the student’s vocabulary and translation skills. This course may be used a BIB/NWT/OLT/THE elective.
Prerequisite: LNG 273.

LNG 383-93 Intermed Spanish I – II 3 credits each

Intensive training in conversation with additional practice in grammar, reading, and composition.
Prerequisite: LNG 293 or advanced placement.

LNG 491–3 Topics in Advanced Language Study 1-3 credits

Special topics of varied interest in biblical or modern languages are offered as needed and as resources permit.
Prerequisite: Basic language study, placement or approval of instructor.

Music Education

MED 313 Elementary Music Methods and Materials 3 credits

A class designed to equip the student with techniques necessary for teaching music in the elementary school setting. Emphasis will be placed on teaching craft and curriculum development. Includes field experiences.
Prerequisites: MED 101, MUS 223, MUS 221, PSY 223, EDU 263, PSY 383, PHE 311. Formal admission into the music education program.

MED 333Secondary Music Methods and Materials 3 credits

A class designed to equip the student with techniques necessary for teaching music in the high school setting. Emphasis will be placed on teaching craft and curriculum development. Includes field experiences.
Prerequisite: MED 313.

MED 373 Technology in Music Education 2 credits

A course designed to explore technology in the music classroom. Emphasis will be placed on instructional software, notation and production software, multimedia, music performance and Internet resources. Students will create an electronic portfolio.
Prerequisite: MED 313.

MED 392 Choral Methods and Materials 3 credits

Instructional methods and materials for teaching vocal music at the elementary and secondary school levels. Includes field experiences.
Prerequisites: EDU 101, MED 313, MED 333

MED 393 Instrumental Methods and Materials 3 credits

Instructional methods and materials for teaching instrumental music at both the elementary and secondary schools levels.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Music Education, Elementary Music Methods and Materials, Secondary Music Methods and Materials. Includes field experiences.
Prerequisites: EDU 101, MED 313, MED 333.

MED 466 Student Teaching 12 credits

Observation and supervised teaching in vocal and instrumental music in an approved public school music department. Student teaching takes place in the senior year and is composed of two segments: seven weeks in an elementary classroom setting and seven weeks in a secondary setting. Course credit represents preparation and planning, classroom performance and classroom management. Students may not register for ensembles or lessons during the semester in which they student teach.
Prerequisite: MED 391 music education coordinator’s permissionand acceptance into the music education program. Please see Other Charges (page 20) for student teaching fee information. Corequisite: MED 471

MED 471 Student Teaching Seminar 1 credit

A study of current issues, directions and research in music education. Involves weekly conference to correlate methods with field experience. Professional conferences and visitations are integral to the seminar. Required of all music education majors while student teaching. Corequisite: MED 466

MED 610 Guitar Class .5 credits

Teaching methods in accompanying, reading music, history of guitar.
Lab Fee $25. Additional charge of $85 apply for the leasing of instruments.

MED 611 Woodwind I .5 credits

A practical study of the clarinet and saxophone: assembling, holding and maintenance of instrument; embouchure and tone production; transposition; fingering; range; problems in teaching young players; examination of methods and materials; manufacturers, quality, prices. Requires observation in a school program. Lab fee $25. Additional charge of $85 apply for the leasing of instruments.

MED 612 Woodwind II .5 credits

A practical study of flute and double reed instruments: assembling, holding and maintenance of instruments; embouchure and tone production; transposition; fingering; range; problems in teaching young players; examination of methods and materials; manufacturers, quality, prices. Requires observation in a school program. Lab fee $25. Additional charge of $85 apply for the leasing of instruments.

MED 613 Brass I .5 credits

A practical study of the trumpet and horn: holding and maintenance of instrument; embouchure and tone production; transposition; fingering; range; problems in teaching young players; examination of methods and materials; manufacturers, quality, prices. Requires observation in a school program.
Lab Fee $25. Additional charge of $85 apply for the leasing of instruments.

MED 614 Brass II .5 credits

A practical study of the trombone and other low brass instruments: holding and maintenance of instrument; embouchure and tone production; transposition; positions and fingerings; range; problems in teaching young players; examination of m
Lab Fee $25. Additional charge of $85 apply for the leasing of instruments.

MED 617 String I .5 credits

A practical study of the instruments of the string family: problems in teaching, examination of methods and materials for each instrument, fingering and bowing styles, shifting; tone production; manufacturers, quality, prices. Requires observation in a school program.
Lab Fee $25. Additional charge of $85 apply for the leasing of instruments.

MED 627 String Class II .5 credits

A practical study of the cello or bass: problems in teaching, examination of methods and materials for each instrument, fingering and bowing styles, shifting; tone production; manufacturing, quality, prices. Requires observation in a school program
Lab Fee $25. Additional charge of $85 apply for the leasing of instruments.

MED 631 Percussion Class .5 credits

A practical study of the instruments of the percussion family: assembling, holding, maintenance; problems in teaching young players; examination of methods and materials; makes of instruments, quality, and price. Requires observation in a school program
Lab Fee $25. Additional charge of $85 apply for the leasing of instruments.

Mathematics

MTH 103 and MTH 107 Fundamentals of Mathematics I and II 3 credits each

These courses review the basic math skills of mathematical patterns, systems of numeration, and modular arithmetic. Problem solving is emphasized. Placement is based on SAT. Neither course counts toward general education credits needed for graduation.

MTH 113 Business Mathematics 3 credits

A review of quantitative methods designed to meet needs of the business world. The course will review calculations involving whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and algebraic equations. It will also cover aspects of banking, budgeting, insurance, income tax, installment buying, time value of money, payroll deductions, discounts and percentages.
Prerequisite: Minimum Score of 420 on Mathematics SAT OR successful completion of MTH 107 with a grade of C- or higher.

MTH 123 Quantitative Reasoning 3 credits

This course applies mathematics to life skill areas for personal and professional use with an emphasis in problem-solving.
Prerequisite: Minimum Score of 420 on Mathematics SAT OR successful completion of MTH 107 with a grade of C- or higher.

MTH 133 Survey of Mathematics I 3 credits

This course is the first part of a six-credit mathematics requirement designed specifically for early childhood, elementary, and music education majors to give them a deep conceptual understanding of the mathematics taught in the elementary and middle school. Topics covered include numeration, operations with rational numbers, and number theory. A problem-solving approach will be employed.
Prerequisite: Minimum Score of 420 on Mathematics SAT OR successful completion of MTH 107 with a grade of C- or higher.

MTH 203 Introduction to Statistics 3 credits

Statistics has become known as the mathematical tool or approach for analyzing data in order to draw reliable conclusions. This course will consider the most useful statistical methods; identify the statistical methods most widely used in education, psychology, and the social sciences; and study the mathematical formulas that are used in statistical applications.

MTH 233 Survey of Mathematics II 3 credits

Specifically designed for education majors, this course is the second part of a six-credit mathematics requirement. Content includes algebraic reasoning’s, geometry, measurement, and probability and statistics. Critical thinking and problem solving strategies are emphasized. The course will include a unit on interpreting statistics in an educational setting.
Prerequisite: Completion of MTH 133 with a grade of C- or higher.

MTH/PHL 273Introduction to Symbolic Logic 3 credits

An introductory course to help the student understand what reasoning is and how to reason better. Various systems of symbolic logic are studied on a basic level including propositional logic, quantification logic, relations and identity, modal logic, deontic and imperative logic, and belief logic. These logics are applied to hundreds of arguments, many on philosophical topics like free will, morality, and the existence of God. A logical formalization of a Kantian ethical system will be constructed. Fulfills a math or philosophy elective.
Prerequisite: Minimum Score of 420 on Mathematics SAT OR successful completion of MTH 107 with a grade of C- or higher.

MTH 491 Topics in Mathematics 1-3 credits

Special topics of varied interest are offered as needed and as resources permit.

Music Technology

MTN 111 Basic Audio Reinforcement 1 credit

A basic overview of pro audio equipment and their relative application in the church. Students will assemble, mix, troubleshoot and breakdown various systems found in ministry today.
Music technology minors may test out of this class.

MTN 123 Introduction to Music Technology 1 credit

An introduction to the basic concepts of computer-based sequencing, notation, recording and editing along with their applications in the music industry. In addition, rudimentary sound reinforcement concepts will be explored. Students have the option to test out of this class.

MTN 213 Sound Reinforcement Systems 3 credits

A survey of the wide array of equipment and their application to live sound reinforcement and live recording. Emphasis will also be placed on commonly encountered acoustical problems and techniques to neutralize them. Students will have hands-on experience in live concert settings.
Prerequisite: MTN 233 or permission of Instructor.

MTN 233 Principles of Audio Technology3 credits

Systems analysis of contemporary recording and reinforcement technology. Analysis of audio signals including time, frequency and decibels, fundamentals of analog and digital audio applications.

MTN 253Modern Music Production Techniques3 credits

A study of music production using historical, traditional, and current practices. Students will spend extensive time with current software including Reason, Logic and Pro tools.
Prerequisite: MTN 263.

MTN 263 Digital Audio 3 credits

Introduction to digital audio production. Intensive, practical experience in planning, coordinating, directing and producing various audio productions for broadcast. Review of sound design principles and recording techniques for multi-track production in all media production settings. Students learn the functioning and operation of basic digital audio workstations, digital and analog tape recorders, microphones, mixing consoles, signal processors and loudspeakers as well as rudimentary acoustical physics. Considerable time is also spent on critical listening skills and design aesthetics.

MTN 373 Technology in Music Education 2 credits

A course designed to explore technology in the music classroom. Emphasis will be placed on MIDI, notation and sequencing software, multimedia, music performance and communications.

MTN 412 Multi-Track Recording3 credits

A continuation of techniques introduced in Multi-Track Recording I. Emphasis will be placed on advanced micing, processing, and mixing techniques. Students will record live and studio sessions and will produce a “demo” CD. Students will gain extensive hands-on experience. Prerequisite: MTN 263.

MTN 463 Mixing/Post-Production 3 credits

A course designed to introduce the student to the final stages of the recording process. Emphasis will be placed on manual mixing, automation, mastering, and reproduction.
Prerequisite: MTN 423.

Music

MUS 141 Aural Skills I 1 credit

A course designed to develop sight-singing as well as melodic, rhythmic and harmonic dictation.
Concurrent enrollment in MUS 143. Prerequisite: Passing score on music placement exam.

MUS 142 Fundamentals of Music 3 credits

A course designed to introduce the student to the fundamental elements of music. Emphasis will be placed on basic musical concepts. Placement in this class is determined by examination.
A grade of C or higher is needed to continue into Music Theory I.

MUS 143 Music Theory I 3 credits

A course designed to give the student a theoretical and practical knowledge of the fundamentals of music. Scales, key signatures, intervals, rhythm, triads, and diatonic harmony are studied. Emphasis is placed on four-part choral style writing. A study of the harmonic, melodic, and formal elements of music.
Prerequisite: MUS 142 and/or pass music placement exam.

MUS 151 Aural Skills II 1 credit

A continuation of Aural Skills I.
Concurrent enrollment in MUS 153. Prerequisite: MUS 141 or pass a placement exam.

MUS 153 Music Theory II 3 credits

A continuation of Music Theory I with emphasis on harmonic progression, triads in inversion, musical form, non-chord tones, and seventh chords.
Prerequisite: MUS 143.

MUS 201Guitar Class I1 credits

An introduction to the fundamentals of playing acoustic guitar for worship. Basic techniques of playing chords, chord voicing, strumming, and fingerpicking will be explored.

MUS 212Guitar Class II1 credits

This class is designed to refine the techniques introduced in Guitar Class I, with an emphasis on applying those techniques in the context of worship choruses. Students will continue to develop their skills by playing the most common chords and chord progressions with rhythmic stability.

MUS 221 Aural Skills III 1 credit

A continuation of Aural Skills II.
Concurrent enrollment in MUS 223. Prerequisite: Aural Skills II or pass a placement exam.

MUS 223 Music Theory III 3 credits

A continuation of Music Theory II with emphasis on secondary dominant chords, modulation, binary and ternary forms, borrowed chords, and augmented sixth chords.
Prerequisite: MUS 153.

MUS 231 Aural Skills IV 1 credit

A continuation of Aural Skills III.
Concurrent enrollment in MUS 233. Prerequisite: Aural Skills III or pass a placement exam.

MUS 233 Music Theory IV 3 credits

A continuation of Music Theory III with emphasis on advanced chromatic harmony, late nineteenth-and twentieth-century practices, musical form, and counterpoint.
Prerequisite: MUS 223.

MUS 302Rhythm Section Methods2 credits

A course designed for worship leaders to explore the unique roles and features of the various instruments in the rhythm section of a worship band. An emphasis will be placed on how to communicate with the instrumentalists by using appropriate musical terminology.

MUS 310 Piano Proficiency 0 credits

Required of all Music concentration students as well as music minors. All sections of the piano proficiency exam must be passed by the end of the junior year. See Music Department Handbook for details.

MUS 313 Music History I 3 credits

Studies of the periods and styles of music in theory, form, performance and practice. Important people, places and events that effect the development of church music will be discussed. Historical influences and important events of church music history will be surveyed. Covers the period from antiquity through the Baroque. Attention will be given to church masters.

MUS 320 Junior Recital 0 credits

A junior-level project required of students enrolled in the contemporary track of the Music Performance degree. The recital will consist of at least 45 minutes of contemporary Christian music and will feature the student as soloist.

MUS 323 Music History II 3 credits

A continuation of Music History I The Classic, Ro- mantic and Modern periods will be studied. The major composers, forms, and styles of music from 1750 to the present will be emphasized. Specific attention will be given to church music masters.

MUS 333 Music History III 3 credits

A study of composers, musical styles and developments from 1901 to the present. This course will examine music in form, performance and practice including world music, folk, and jazz.

MUS 341 Conducting Lab .5 credits

A course designed to give the student an opportunity to select, rehearse and conduct choral or instrumental works under the supervision of a faculty member. Emphasis will be placed on rehearsal organization and administration. This lab is required for all students in the Church Music program.
Class meets once per week. Lab fee $25.

MUS 342 Basic Conducting 2 credits

A course designed to introduce the student to the fundamental concepts of conducting. Beat patterns, entrances and releases, cueing, score preparation and rehearsing will be covered.
Prerequisite: MUS 153.

MUS 362 Choral Conducting 2 credits

Explores techniques of choral conducting, including group vocal technique and repertoire. Attention is given to various style periods and their characteristic sound quality.
Prerequisite: MUS 342.

MUS 382 Instrumental Conducting 2 credits

Explores techniques of instrumental conducting, including problems of the instrumental medium. The course also includes an analysis and interpretation of literature appropriate for use in schools and the community. Students conduct the Wind Ensemble.
Prerequisite: MUS 342.

MUS 403Songwriting3 credits

A course designed to introduce the techniques of writ- ing worship choruses. The class will emphasize the development of melodic ideas, crafting song sections that combine into a unified whole, formal structure, harmonic progressions, and writing lyrics based on sound biblical theology.

MUS 410 Senior Recital 0 credits

A senior project consisting of a performance of at least 50 minutes of music. Students in Church Music will perform a 30-minute recital on their primary instrument and a 20-minute conducting recital. Students in Music Performance will present a 50-minute recital entirely on their primary applied instrument, emphasizing classical music literature from all periods of music history.

MUS 411 Seminar in Contemporary Music 2 credits

A seminar course that explores topics including: concert promotion, booking, developing the concert program, and stage presence, as well as Web commerce and ministry organization finances.
Prerequisite: MUS 231, 233.

MUS 412 Songwriting and Arranging 3 credits

A course in creative musical composition and arranging. Students will apply their musical knowledge in a variety of creative writing assignments, including songwriting and orchestration. Required for Church Music majors and Music Performance majors.
Prerequisite: MUS 233.

MUS 422 Piano Literature 2 credits

A survey of the keyboard literature from all periods of music history.

MUS 432 Vocal Literature 2 credits

A survey of the vocal literature from all periods of music history.

MUS 442 Instrumental Literature 2 credits

A survey of instrumental and orchestral literature from all periods of music history.

MUS 452 Piano Pedagogy 2 credits

A course designed to provide the student with the concepts and techniques of teaching piano. The class will study historical aspects of piano pedagogy in the United States, survey current methods and materials related to teaching piano, and examine methods and procedures of professional studio organization and management.

MUS 462 Vocal Pedagogy 2 credits

A course designed to provide the student with concepts and techniques of teaching voice.

MUS 472 Instrumental Pedagogy 2 credits

A course designed to provide the student with concepts and techniques of teaching brass, woodwind, percussion or guitar.

MUS 481 Internship 1 credit

This phase of the student’s education is to provide a supervised experience in direct ministry. All internships must be approved and processed through the Internship office. Internships can range from 4 to 15 weeks. An internship must be for at least 1 credit hour but can be expanded for up to 3 credit hours. A comprehensive journal is required that addresses the student’s activities during the internship and issues of development in their area of ministry. Written evaluations are required by the intern and the on-site supervisor. Internships are tailored in conjunction with the student’s focus of development and future ministry plans.

MUS 482 Music Ethics 2 credits

Ethical responsibilities of the musician in Contemporary Christian Music will be covered. Music philosophy, contracts, and Copyright Law will also be explored.
Prerequisite: MUS 231, 233.

Music Instruction (Applied)

Private music lessons are offered as qualified instruc- tors are available. They may be taken for one credit (half-hour lesson per week) or two credits (one-hour lesson per week). Fourteen lessons per semester are scheduled. Minimum practice requirements are de- termined in consultation with the instructor. Lessons may be taken on a non-credit basis with payment of full tuition and the applied music fee. Non-credit students are scheduled after all credit students are accommodated.

MUS 611 Class Voice I 1 credit

An introduction to fundamentals of good vocal production to students with little or no formal training. Areas of concentration include vocal hygiene, breath control, tone production, diction and interpretation. Sacred and secular literature will be studied as well as hymns and gospel songs. Meets twice per week.

MUS 612 Class Voice II 1 credit

Continuation of Voice Class I. Further emphasis will be placed upon breathing, tone production, diction and musical styles. Exposure is given to singing in foreign languages, with a cross section of classical and sacred solo literature as well as hymns and gospel songs. Meets twice per week.
Prerequisite: MUS 611. Please see Other Charges (page 20) for fee information.

MUS 621 Class Piano I 1 credit

An introduction to the fundamentals of keyboard technique. Beginning piano students must enroll in this course. Meets twice per week. This course does not count toward general education credits needed for graduation if the student is music major or minor.
Class fee $20.

MUS 622 Class Piano II 1 credit

A continuation of MUS 621. Meets twice per week. This course does not count toward general education credits needed for graduation if the student is a music major or minor.
Prerequisite: MUS 621. Class fee $20.

MUS 631-2 Applied Piano 1-2 credits

Offered at all levels of instruction. Literature is chosen from standard works for piano according to the student’s ability.
Prerequisite: MUS 622 or piano proficiency audition. Please see Other Charges (page 20) for fee information.

MUS 641-2 Applied Organ 1-2 credits

Offered at all levels of instruction. Literature is chosen from standard works for organ according to the student’s ability. Please see Other Charges (page 20) for fee information.

MUS 651-2 Applied Voice 1-2 credits

Instruction in understanding the singing voice and establishing a sound vocal technique. Literature studied will include a standard vocal repertoire in English and foreign languages as well as hymns and gospel songs.
Prerequisite: MUS 611 or voice proficiency audition and MUS 631 or music reading audition. Please see Other Charges (page 20) for fee information.

MUS 661-2 Applied Instrumental 1-2 credits

Instruction Instruction in non-keyboard instruments as appropriate instructors are available. Please see Other Charges (page 20) for fee information.

MUS 671-2 Piano Improvisation 1-2 credits

Skills of piano improvisation are introduced in this class. Techniques of playing chords, octaves, arpeggios, transposition, modulation, and various playing styles are explored. Essential qualities of skillful piano improvisation will be defined and developed.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Please see Other Charges (page 20) for fee information.

MUS 681-2 Introduction to Classical Guitar 1-2 credits

An introduction to the classical guitar for students with little or no previous formal training. Students will learn to read and play simple melodic lines. Basic chords and some music theory also will be applied.
Requirement: 6 string guitar. Please see Other Charges (page 20) for fee information.

MUS 691 Applied Voice Seminar 1 credit

A course furthering the student’s development from the view of preparation and performing through a master-class setting. Students are expected to perform in this class at least 6 times per semester. Advanced language diction will be discussed and applied during individual coaching’s with the student. As well, a survey of vocal literature will be taught in order to further the student’s grasp of available materials for singing and teaching. All styles of vocal music will be covered: classical, sacred, gospel, and contemporary.
Prerequisite: MUS 611 or voice proficiency audition and MUS 631 or music reading audition. Please see Other Charges (page 20) for fee information.

Ensembles

MUS 700 Instrumental Ensembles .5 credit

Special instrumental groups may be formed if there is sufficient interest. For credit or non-credit. Admission by approval of the instructor.

MUS 701 Guitar Ensemble .5 credit

Guitar Ensemble is open to both music majors and non-music majors with a background and interest in electric or acoustic guitar. This organization fulfills the required ensemble credits for guitar students enrolled in all three music major programs. The ensemble will perform on campus throughout the academic year. Course may be taken for credit or non-credit and admission is by approval of instructor.

MUS 703Orchestra.5 credit

An instrumental ensemble organized primarily to accompany the choral ensembles for concerts on and off campus. This group is open to students, faculty, and staff by invitation, audition, or permission from the director. Ensemble may be taken for credit or audit.

MUS 710 Brass Ensemble .5 credit

An ensemble open to all brass students. The organization will perform standard brass literature and some sacred pieces.

MUS 711 Concert Choir .5-1 credit

The touring choir of the college. Vocalists, accompanists and instrumentalists are selected by audition and must be academically eligible to participate. Enrollment in fall semester requires a 1-year commitment since tours are scheduled throughout the year. Students are required to purchase their own attire. Non-music majors may take Concert Choir for up to one credit; music majors for .5 credit only.
Prerequisite: audition and concurrent enrollment in MUS 751. Fee $50.

MUS 720 Woodwind Ensemble .5 credit

An ensemble with flexible instrumentation. Group performs standard Woodwind Quintet, Quartet or Trio literature as well as sacred pieces.

MUS 721 Accompanying Ensemble .5 credit

An ensemble open to music majors whose primary instrument is the piano. Participants will be required to accompany vocal and instrumental students in the context of private lessons and on-campus recitals. Music majors receive ensemble credit for their participation and may enroll up to four semesters.

MUS 730 Madrigals .5 credit

A small mixed choral ensemble open to all students by audition. Music of the Renaissance and Baroque eras will be featured.
Fee $50.

MUS 731 Percussion Ensemble .5 credit

Percussion Ensemble is open to both music majors and non-music majors with a background and interest in percussion. This organization fulfills the required ensemble credits for percussion students enrolled in all three music major programs. The ensemble will perform on campus throughout the academic year. Course may be taken for credit or non-credit and admission is by approval of instructor.

MUS 742 Women’s Vocal Ensemble .5 credit

An ensemble devoted to performing a variety of classical, sacred, contemporary and gospel music. This group performs on or off-campus and may be taken for credit only.
Prerequisite: Permission from instructor or Department Chair and concurrent enrollment in MUS 711.

MUS 740 Opera Workshop .5 credit

A small ensemble allowing students to participate in a variety of scenes, focusing on diction, acting, movement, and staging.
Fee $50

MUS 741 Men’s Vocal Ensemble .5 credit

A small vocal ensemble performing a variety of sacred, contemporary and gospel music. This ensemble performs on and off-campus and may be taken for credit or non-credit.
Prerequisite: Permission from instructor and concurrent enrollment in MUS 711.

MUS 750 Chapel Ensemble .5 credit

Small ensembles are formed under faculty supervision. Students are selected by audition and will perform sacred and contemporary worship music.

MUS 751 College Choir .5 credit

A non-touring choir formed for participation in chapel services, special on-campus events, and occasional off-campus events. Students are required to purchase their own attire. Open to students and non-students for credit or non-credit.
Fee $50.

MUS 760 Chosen .5 credit

A contemporary traveling team consisting of vocalists and instrumentalists. Students are selected by audition and tour throughout the year.

MUS 761 String Ensemble .5 credit

An ensemble open to violinists, violists, cellists and string bass players. This organization will fulfill the required ensemble credits for string students enrolled in all three music major programs. This ensemble will perform on campus throughout the academic year. Course may be taken for credit or non-credit and admission is by approval of instructor.

MUS 770 Pneuma .5 credit

A contemporary traveling team consisting of vocalists and instrumentalists. Students are selected by audition and tour throughout the year.

MUS 771 Wind Ensemble .5 credit

An instrumental organization open to all students. The band presents concerts in the college chapel, area churches and provides music for college events, e.g., college sports events. For credit or non-credit. Admission by approval of the instructor.

MUS 781 Handbell Ensemble .5 credit

Handbell Ensemble includes an introduction to handbell ringing, performances, and procedures for creating a handbell choir. The class is open to both music majors and non-music majors with an interest in handbells and includes weekly rehearsals and several on- and off-campus performances. Course maybe taken for credit or non-credit and admission is by approval of instructor.
Fee $35.

MUS 791 Gospel Choir .5 credit

This ensemble is a journey through the genre of gospel music in America. From its birth in the early 1930s, the journey will include traditional spirituals and hymns through the modern gospel music of the21st century. The gospel choir is open to all students, including non-music majors and will travel approximately twice per month. Instrumentalists will be selected based on audition.

New Testament

NWT 113 New Testament Survey 3 credits

A panoramic view of the chief events, prominent characters, main themes and salient teachings of each New Testament book in relation to its historical, geographical and cultural contexts.

NWT 223 Gospels: The Life of Jesus 3 credits

A comprehensive study of the four Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke and John) including the background and authorship of each book and its particular content and orientation. The life and ministry of Christ is studied. Key parables are studied and interpreted.
Prerequisite: NWT 113.

NWT 243 Book of Acts 3 credits

A study of the theological and practical teachings of the historical origins of the early Church. Special attention is given to the theology and work of the Holy Spirit in the evangelistic expansion of the Church.
Prerequisite: NWT 113.

NWT 313 I and II Corinthians 3 credits

A study of Paul’s treatment of church problems, with application to the present day Church. Paul’s defense of his apostolic call and ministry are the focus of II Corinthians.
Prerequisite: NWT 113.

NWT 333 Romans 3 credits

An exegetical study of the Epistle to the Romans emphasizing its contribution to Christian theology and life.
Prerequisite: NWT 113.

NWT 363 Prison Epistles 3 credits

A study of Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians and Philemon, with special attention to their Christological content. Historical, geographical and biographical matters are also considered.
Prerequisite: NWT 113.

NWT 383 Epistle to the Hebrews 3 credits

A study of the Epistle to the Hebrews showing the exaltation of Christ as the final and complete revelation of God and His truth to mankind.
Prerequisite: NWT 113.

NWT 491-3 Topics in New Testament 1-3 credits

Special topics of varied interest are offered as needed and as resources permit.

Old Testament

OLT 123 Old Testament Survey 3 credits

A study of the historical settings, literary features, authorship, theological teachings, and general content of the books of the Hebrew Bible. This survey provides a factual and practical groundwork for further studies in the Old Testament.

OLT 213 Pentateuch 3 credits

A study of the first five books of the Old Testament. Special attention is given to sacred history, the Mosaic laws, ethical and moral values, and the creation of a people of God.
Prerequisite: OLT 123.

OLT 303 Historical Books 3 credits

A study of the books of Joshua through Esther tracing the development of Israel into a kingdom and its sub-sequent dissolution. Attention is given to the theme of each book and the lessons derived from the relations of the ruler with God.
Prerequisite: OLT 123.

OLT 313 Psalms and Wisdom Literature 3 credits

A study of the books of Job through Song of Solomon with special emphasis on Psalms. Methods of studying Hebrew poetry are learned along with the values of each book for theology, worship and everyday life.
Prerequisite: OLT 123.

OLT 323 Isaiah 3 credits

An exegetical study of this prophetic book with an emphasis on its historical setting, literary qualities and theological teachings. The Christological prophecies in Isaiah and their fulfillment in the New Testament are highlighted.
Prerequisite: OLT 123.

OLT 333 Jeremiah 3 credits

A study of the life and prophecies of Jeremiah emphasizing its historical setting and fulfilled and unfulfilled prophecies. The book of Lamentations will be studies in its relationship to the book of Jeremiah.
Prerequisite: OLT 123.

OLT 343 Ezekiel 3 credits

A study of the genre, organization and content of the prophecies of the book with respect to Ezekiel’s exilic setting and ministry. The theology, practical truths and prophetic teachings of the book are emphasized.
Prerequisite: OLT 123.

OLT 353 Minor Prophets 3 credits

A study of the books from Hosea through Malachi. The historical, prophetical and practical values of each book are emphasized.
Prerequisite: OLT 123.

OLT 491-3 Topics in Old Testament 1-3 credits

Special topics of varied interest are offered as needed and as resources permit.

Physical Education

PHE 131 Game Management Team I 1 credits

The Game Management Team course will deal with the responsibilities of hosting an athletic event at Valley Forge Christian College. The course will give you the insight of how each home game is operated outside the playing lines. The course will build on PHE 131 and continue teach you how important game management impacts the student-athletes and visitors who compete or attend the games. (BSA)

PHE 132 Game Management Team II 1 credits

The Game Management Team course will deal with the responsibilities of hosting an athletic event at Valley Forge Christian College. The course will give you the insight of how each home game is operated outside the playing lines. The course will build on PHE 131 and continue teach you how important game management impacts the student-athletes and visitors who compete or attend the games. (BSA)
Prerequisite: PHE 131

PHE 200 Intercollegiate Varsity Sports 1 credits

A course for anyone desiring to participate in an officially recognized varsity sports program. May be taken once every semester. A student must be academically eligible to participate.

PHE 201 Physical Conditioning 1 credits

An introduction to aerobic and anaerobic exercising with an emphasis on principles and techniques of physical conditioning.

PHE 211 Bowling and Walking 1 credits

Walking: A course designed to introduce the student to aerobic exercise and conditioning with an emphasis on walking. Bowling: This portion of the course emphasizes the fundamental skills, rules and tactics of bowling, accomplished through personal instruction and participation at a local bowling establishment.
Fee $30.00.

PHE 221 Basketball 1 credits

A course designed to develop basketball skills with a concentration on rules, regulations, and physical conditioning.

PHE 251 Volleyball – Coed 1 credits

A course designed to develop volleyball skills with concentration on rules, regulations and physical conditioning.

PHE 261 5-K Dana Marie & Beyond 1 credits

A course designed to prepare for and participate in a 5-K Walk/Run, specifically for the Run for Dana Marie which is held the last Sunday of April in downtown Phoenixville.

PHE 262 Principles of Coaching & Sports First Aid 1 credits

A course designed to introduce basic principles and methods of coaching sports in the school program. This course focuses on meeting the ASEP requirements for coaching certification (currently recognized in 39 states). Attention is also given to the development of a coaching philosophy, the components of an effective practice plan and to help understand the coach’s responsibilities, legalities, and obligations as it relates to first aid for athletes

PHE 271 Weight Training 1 credits

A course designed to introduce the student to basic weight training principles and techniques with a concentration on physical conditioning.

PHE 275 Self Defense 1 credits

Covers basic methods of hybrid self-defense techniques including theories, concepts, and principles from traditional karate, American kenpo, jeet kune do, tae kwon do, boxing, jujitsu, grappling, and weaponry.

PHE 281 Health and Nutrition 1 credits

This course is an overview of personal health and stress management strategies for identifying and preventing health problems. Successful exercise, wellness, and nutrition programs are introduced. Maybe taken one time only.
This course is required of all students.

PHE 291 Physical Education Class – Coed 1 credits

Physical education activity classes, group games, individual and team sports dealing with the rules, skills, and strategies of the various sports taught and emphasizing carry-over value. This course varies from semester to semester but covers a variety of activities, games, and sports.

PHE 491–3 Topics in Physical Education 1-3 credits

Special topics of varied interest are offered as needed and as resources permit.

Philosophy

PHL 113 Worldviews 3 credits

This course will examine and apply principles involved in the development of a worldview. The course will emphasize the development and application of a Christian worldview. Special emphasis will be given to critical, creative, and Christian thinking skills.

PHL 213 Introduction to Philosophy 3 credits

A survey of the fundamentals of philosophy, including essential terminology and major thinkers. An overview of metaphysics, epistemology, deductive and inductive logic, ethics and philosophy of religion.

PHL/MTH 273 Introduction to Symbolic Logic 3 credits

An introductory course to help the student understand what reasoning is and how to reason better. Various systems of symbolic logic are studied on a basic level including propositional logic, quantification logic, relations and identity, modal logic, deontic and imperative logic, and belief logic. These logics are applied to hundreds of arguments, many on philosophical topics like free will, morality, and the existence of God. A logical formalization of a Kantian ethical system will be constructed.
Fulfills a math or philosophy elective.

PHL 303 Worldview Perspectives of City Life 3 credits

Examines the development of worldview perspectives of groups and individuals within the urban context. Particular attention is given to philosophical and ethical dimensions of deism, existentialism, naturalism, nihilism, pantheism, pluralism, and postmodern

PHL 306 Urban Issues and Ethics 3 credits

The city is used as a context for examining criminal justice, economic development, housing, public health, welfare reform, and other urban condition. Examines ethical interpretations and response to issues such as economic impoverishment, political disenfranchisement, and social marginalization. Special attention is given to personal and group obligations to the urban community and the role of churches in Christian social justice.

PHL 323 Apologetics 3 credits

An examination of the intellectual responses of Christianity to the challenges that have been posed by some in history, philosophy, science, and related areas. An overview of meta-issues (the nature of Christianity, nature of knowledge or epistemology, etc.), discussions of specific issues (the existence of God, the reliability of Scripture, the problem of evil, etc.), and consideration of practical issues (how best to present arguments, etc.) are included. A brief synopsis of philosophy is presented for perspective as a course introduction.

PHL 343 Ethics 3 credits

An examination of historic and modern methods for ethical decision-making. Primary emphasis is given to using those methods to suggest Christian solutions for the personal, economic and religious problems of our day.

PHL/REL 353 Traditions of Spirituality 3 credits

An introduction to the methodology of comparative religions and a critical exploration of various religious traditions including, but not limited to: Animism, Buddhism, Hinduism, Mormonism, Islam, mysticism, and occultism. An understanding of the Judeo-Christian tradition is assumed.

PHL/REL 363 Philosophy of Religions 3 credits

A critical exploration of philosophy in relation to and within historic and contemporary religious systems. Emphasis will be placed on the interaction of secular philosophies and various religious systems and the use of philosophy by systems in relation to the role of intellect, apologetics, other religions, God, salvation, history, eternity, etc.

PHL 491-3 Topics in Philosophy 1-3 credits

Special topics of varied interest are offered as needed and as resources permit.

Political Science

POL 203The American Republic: An Introduction to American Government and Politics 3 credits

This course explores the roots of the American form of government, its structures, its institutions, and the political process.

Preaching

PRE 213 Foundations of Biblical 3 credits

An introduction to sermon preparation and preaching combining theory and practice. Lectures cover theoretical and practical aspects of sermons and their preparation, structure and delivery.
Prerequisites: COM 123 or 494, BIB 103 when applicable, BIB 213, OLT 123 and NWT 113.

PRE 343 Advanced Biblical Preaching 3 credits

An advanced course in sermon preparation and delivery. Emphasis is given to systematic exposition of Scripture within its context. Focus is placed on techniques for preaching from epistolary, narrative, poetic, and prophetic passages. A laboratory approach stresses actual classroom practice and sermon evaluation.
Prerequisite: PRE 213

PRE 353 Preaching in Pastoral Ministry 3 credits

This course builds upon Foundations of Biblical Preaching (PRE 213) and equips the student to preach from a variety of biblical genres with contemporary relevance.
Prerequisite: PRE 213.

PRE 413 Evangelistic Preaching 3 credits

Examines style, form and content of sermons designed to lead the hearers to become Christians. The student will construct and deliver at least five evangelistic sermons.
Prerequisite: PRE 213.

PRE 423 Preaching in Youth Ministry 3 credits

Examines style, form, content, and variety of sermons designed to bring the dynamic truth of the Word of God to the emerging generations. Techniques of communication to a post-Christian, postmodern, media-oriented, multi-task centered culture are of primary concern. The student will prepare, deliver, and evaluate sermons for use in a variety of settings to impact youth.
Prerequisite: PRE 213.

PRE 433 Preaching Cross-Culturally 3 credits

Emphasizes preparation to preach in a cross-cultural setting. Narrative and dialogue style preaching, contextualization, adapting messages to local culture and speaking through an interpreter will be explored.
Prerequisite: PRE 213.

PRE 443 Preaching from Jesus’ Parables 3 credits

Examines the formation and intent of Jesus’ parables and their effect on the hearers. The student will construct and deliver sermons from Gospel parables.
Prerequisites: NWT 223 and PRE 213

PRE 453 Imaginative Communication 3 credits

This course will explore creative ways in which to communicate biblical truths to contemporary culture. The student will develop skills to responsibly study passages or themes of the Bible and then communicate them in ways that will not necessarily follow traditional preaching modes. This course contains a laboratory component, which allows students to practice and experiment with presentation forms and content.
Prerequisite: PRE 213.

PRE 463 Preaching on Doctrinal Issues 3 credits

This course will examine the importance of sound doctrine in preaching. It introduces both theory and practice of preaching doctrine from various biblical genres. The student will construct and deliver sermons based on the Statement of Fundamental Truths of the Assemblies of God.
Prerequisites: THE 233 and PRE 213.

PRE 473 Preaching in Children’s Ministry 3 credits

How to plan and construct sermons for children. Methods of visualizing the Gospel will be presented. Special emphasis is given to altar calls, altar ministry, and age-level appropriate preaching for response.
Prerequisite: PRE 213.

PRE 483 Preaching from the Gospels 3 credits

This is an advanced preaching class that will focus upon preaching from three specific genres of the Gospels. The genres to be covered included Gospel narratives, parables and prophetic passages. Emphasis is given to systematic exposition of Scripture within its context. Focus is placed on techniques for preaching Gospel passages. A laboratory approach will be taken which stresses actual classroom practice and sermon evaluation.
Prerequisite: PRE 213.

PRE 491-3 Topics in Preaching 1-3 credits

Special topics of varied interest are offered as needed and as resources permit.

Pastoral Ministry

PST 261 Church Planting Field Assessment 1 credit

A field assessment course in which the student will interface with effective church plant(s)/planter(s) in amateur stage of development. The student will investigate the process of church planting from inception to the current state of the church and complete a critical analysis of the process.

PST 303 Caregivers at Risk 3 credits

This course is a study of the basic principles essential to maintaining health in the context of church-related ministries. An emphasis is given to developing a Christ-centered lifestyle. Psychological assessments are administered to assist students in identifying personal issues that hinder psychological well-being and impede transformational change. Through small group exercises and non-judgmental community, students are encouraged to develop relationships that facilitate support and accountability.

PST 313 Principles of Leadership 3 credits

A study of the basic principles of leadership philosophy, goals and strategies. Includes an overview of leadership styles, time management, conflict resolution, communication, legal issues, development of mission statements, and professional etiquette and ethics.

PST 353 Age-Specific Student Ministries 3 credits

Youth Ministry can vary greatly from middle school to high school to college. This course takes an in-depth look at how we can address the needs of these age groups, what challenges are faced in reaching an discipling these age groups, and strategies for developing viable ministries to address the unique needs and challenges of these three age-focused groups. Students will be exposed to several outside ministries to observe how the church is currently focusing on each specific age group.

PST 363 Pastoring Children 3 credits

This course will help the student to minister to children in their life situations. Attention is given to teaching children to worship and pray, relating theological concepts and biblical truths to children, identifying social influences which affect children, and understanding the unique spiritual needs of children.

PST 383 Senior Adult Ministry 3 credits

A specialized study of senior adult ministry in the light of societal changes resulting from longer life expectancy, early and extended retirement, and productivity in post-retirement years. This course examines the church’s response to this emerging social reality and offers a forum for projecting models for future ministry.

PST 392 Church Growth 3 credits

A survey of biblical and sociological principles affecting church growth and decline. The dynamics of both qualitative and quantitative growth will be examined, including methods of assessment and planning for change.

PST 403 Introducing Spiritual Gifts in the Church 3 credits

Analysis of the New Testament focus on spiritual gifts as found in Romans 12, 1 Corinthians 12-14, Ephesians 4, and 1 Peter 4. One third of the course examines biblical interpretation in light of Pentecostal theology. The remainder of the course deals with application of these principles in the development and operation of spiritual gifts in the church.

PST 423 Pastoral Ministry and Practice 3 credits

An overview of the character, qualifications and call of the pastor. Instruction is given in conducting common church ceremonies: water baptism, communion, infant dedication, installation of officers, weddings, and funerals. Includes principles for conducting church business meetings, parliamentary procedure, visitation and pastoral care.

PST 433 Church Finance and Resource Management 3 credits

The role of the pastor in financial and physical plant oversight in the local church. An overview of office and personnel management, facilities management, fundraising, accounting procedures, budgeting, fiscal accountability, record keeping, and annual reporting. Introduces computer software useful for church administration, legal and tax records, and general church business.

PST 443 Disciple Making & Equipping Ministry 3 credits

A biblical foundation for understanding Christian discipleship through both academic study and a community lab experience. Attention is given to both personal development and the discipleship of others.

PST 471 Internship Seminar 1 credits

This course is to prepare the student for his/her internship. Emphasis will be placed upon self understanding, conflict resolution, and the practical concerns faced by interns. Time will also be given to formalize the specifics for each internship.
This course is a Prerequisite for PST 481.

PST 481 Internship1 credits

This phase of the student’s education is to provide a supervised experience in direct ministry. All internships must be approved and processed through the Internship office. Internships can range from 6 to 15 weeks. Students are required to complete practical field work in addition to written work, and field supervisors will assess student performance during the internship. Internships must be major-specific.
Prerequisite: PST 471.

PST 482 Church Planting Internship 2 credits

This course will provide the student with extended field experience. The student will gain experience, develop a comfort level with the rigors of church planting, and be mentored by a church planter. Field evaluation and written work will be required for this course.

PST 483Senior Capstone Experience1 credits

The culminating preparation for ministerial vocation for seniors in practical ministry majors. In com- munity, students reflect on their experiences, refine skills, prepare portfolios, and work on job placement. (Theological and Biblical Studies Majors take THE 483, Theological Studies Capstone, instead.)

PST 491-3 Topics in Pastoral Ministry 1-3 credits

Special topics of varied interest are offered as needed and as resources permit.

Psychology

PSY 223 Introduction to Psychology 3 credit

An introduction to the basic concepts of human behavior, motivation, emotion and personality, and a survey of the contemporary psychological field.

PSY 263 Psychometrics 3 credit

A variety of test instruments is surveyed as potential assessment tools in variety of settings; vocational, intellectual, personality, and learning styles. A significant part of the course involves training in test construction and using measures of reliability and validity as a basis for test selection.
Prerequisite: PSY 223.

PSY 283 Lifespan Human Development 3 credit

A survey of human development from conception to death. Focus is on the biological, intellectual, and psycho-social development of the individual person.
Prerequisite: PSY 223.

PSY 300 Organizational Psychology 3 credit

This course will provide the student with an overview of the field of Organizational Psychology. An emphasis will be placed on motivation, job satisfaction, leadership, decision making, teams in the workplace, organizational change and human factors. Students will also examine emerging trends and historical theory. Case studies will be extensively used.
Prerequisite: PSY 223.

PSY 303 Biological Psychology 3 credit

A study of interrelationship between the psychological and physiological bases of human behavior including analysis of emotions, motivation and perception.
Prerequisite: PSY 223.

PSY 313 Theories of Personality 3 credit

A study of theories relating to the development and structure of personality. Biographies are included enabling students to contextualize the social and family dynamics of major theorists.
Prerequisites: PSY 223 and PSY 283.

PSY 323 History and Systems in Psychology 3 credit

A study of the evolving thought in psychology from its inception as an experimental science to development of significant systems and experiments. Provides an overview of historical and contemporary systems and theories.
Prerequisite: PSY 223.

PSY 325 Introduction to Equine Studies 3 credit

Provides an overview in basic equine care. Basic health care issues will be addressed as well as anatomy and physiology. Emphasis will be placed on understanding and interpreting horse behavior. Class format will include classroom lecture and discussion as well as a field experience component. Students are required to perform basic horse care such as grooming and tacking up, and to become comfortable around the horse.
$165 Lab fee.

PSY 333 Pastoral Counseling 3 credit

An introduction to the pastoral perspective in counseling. A study of the biblical basis for counseling will be conducted. Emphasis will be given to a survey of techniques for premarital, marriage, family, career guidance, grief, and pre-referral counseling.
Prerequisite: PSY 223.

PSY 343 Legal and Ethical Issues in Counseling 3 credit

Sensitive issues in counseling, from both the pastoral and professional perspective, will be examined for the purpose of preventing legal and ethical misconduct. Special attention will be given to the development of ethical thinking when involved with cross-cultural clients, issues of competency, and dual relationships.
Prerequisite: PSY 223.

PSY 353 Community Psychology 3 credit

An introduction to the basic concepts in community mental health, from theories, to research, to actual settings in which students may work or volunteer. Strategies for changing the lives of others in the community for the better will be a focus of this course.
Prerequisites: PSY 223.

PSY 363 Abnormal Psychology 3 credit

Behavioral deviations from the norm are assessed and classified according to DSM-IV multi-axial criteria. Special attention is given to the developmental and genetic factors that contribute to abnormal behavior. Assessment, diagnosis, and treatment strategies are examined in light of current research.
Prerequisites: PSY 223 and PSY 283.

PSY 373 Industrial Psychology 3 credit

This course will provide the student with an overview of the field of Industrial Psychology. The student will be introduced to research and assessment of the work environment, assessing individuals, job analysis and performance measurement, staffing decisions and training development. An emphasis will be placed on emerging trends in the workplace, historical theories and models.
Prerequisite: PSY 223.

PSY 375 Riding Skills & Techniques 3 credit

An introductory riding class geared toward students with little experience. Students with experience will be allowed to advance according to their levels of mastery. Basic riding skills are covered. Students will learn to control the horse at the walk, the rising trot, and the two-point position. Ground skills must be mastered before being allowed to ride. The focus will be on basic schooling figures and transitions. The two-point positions is taught and cavalletti and single cross rails may be introduced.
$165 Lab fee.

PSY 383 Educational Psychology 3 credit

A study of learning processes with practical applications for classroom teaching. Topics include human development, the impact of culture and community on learning, learning theory, motivation, testing, and assessment. This course includes a practicum involving observations and interviews with persons working in educational settings.

PSY 403 Experimental Psychology 3 credit

Advanced study in human behavior. This course requires formulation of a research problem and hypothesis, research design, field research, and writing of a major research report.
Prerequisites: PSY 223, PSY 263.

PSY 413 Human Relations in the Work Place 3 credit

This course focuses on developing interpersonal skills for the workplace. Particular emphasis will be placed on understanding diversity, dealing with difficult people and improving employee communication skills. Personal inventories will be used to provide students with insight into their personality predisposition as it relates to effective communication in the workplace. Time and stress management in an organization will also be examined.
Prerequisites: PSY 223, 300, 373.

PSY 414 Marriage and Family Therapy 3 credit

Students will receive specialized training in marriage and family counseling from a systems perspective. Hypothetical cases will be conceptualized, assessed and diagnosed from this orientation. Interventions unique to this approach will be examined.
Prerequisite: PSY 223.

PSY 423 Leadership Development 3 credit

This course will provide the student with an in-depth look at the nature of leadership. Leadership models will be reviewed as well as self-evaluations and practical exercises to develop the student’s ability to lead. The student will learn the importance of increasing employee performance through creating a vision, developing and empowering employees and decision making. Ethics and responsibility will also be explored. Current case studies will be used to enhance the student’s understanding of today’s work place.
Prerequisites: PSY 223, 300, 373.

PSY 463 Theories and Techniques of Counseling 3 credit

A review of major counseling orientations with specialized techniques suitable for use in various counseling settings. Diagnostic instruments for effective assessment will be introduced as part of the curriculum.
Prerequisite: PSY 223.

PSY 471 Internship Seminar 1 credit

This course is to prepare the student for his or her internship. Emphasis will be placed upon self understanding, conflict resolution, and the practical concerns faced by interns. Time will also be given to formalize the specifics for each internship.
This course is a Prerequisite for PSY 481.

PSY 473 Crisis Counseling 3 credit

An introduction to the basic theories and techniques of crisis counseling as it relates to pastoral ministry. Specific attention is given to crisis intervention in areas such as teen pregnancy; suicide; substance, emotional and physical abuse; bereavement and grief; eating disorders; divorce; and family relations. Includes legal and ethical considerations and referrals.
Prerequisites: PSY 223 and 283.

PSY 481 Internship 1 credit

This phase of the student’s education is to provide a supervised experience in direct ministry. All internships must be approved and processed through the Internship office. Internships can range from 4 to 15 weeks. An internship must be for at least 1 credit hour but can be expanded for up to 3 credit hours. A comprehensive journal is required that addresses the student’s activities during the internship and issues of development in their area of ministry. Written evaluations are required by the intern and the on-site supervisor. Internships are tailored in conjunction with the student’s focus of development and future ministry plans.
Prerequisite:PSY 471.

PSY 482 Practicum-Equine Therapy 2 credit

Provides a supervised experience in direct ministry. A comprehensive journal is required that addresses the student’s activities during the practicum and issues of development in the student’s area of ministry. A book reflection as well as a practicum summary will be included in the student’s written work. The on-site supervisor must complete a mid-term and final evaluation form. Internship site must be an approved equine therapy provider. Students will observe and take part in equine therapy sessions, putting into practice previously learned theory. Reading material will reflect Equine Studies and Counseling principles.

PSY 483 Grief, Death, and Dying 3 credit

A detailed examination of the nature and stages of death, customs, and rituals surrounding the death experience are presented, emphasizing the role of the minister in the processes of death and bereavement.
Prerequisite: PSY 223.

PSY 485 Therapeutic Horsemanship 3 credit

Focuses on learning the basic counseling facilitation skills necessary in order to assist a client in processing the experience. The class will be divided into three parts: classroom instruction will provide the basis for understanding the theoretical model of equine interactive counseling; experiential learning will provide the basis for understanding the facilitation process (students will assume the role of ‘client’ while riding and will have instructors facilitate as they process their experience); and field observation, where students will observe and report on trained facilitators at a therapeutic riding center.
$165 Lab fee.

PSY 487 Psychology of Cross-Cultural 3 credit

Adjustment A study of the challenges of living and working effectively in cross-cultural settings, including interpersonal relations, temperament, cultural adjustment, adaptation, and assimilation.

PSY 490 Human Sexuality 3 credit

A study of the biological, psychological, and social dimensions of human sexuality. Focus on biblical principles, formation of gender roles, sexual identity, sexual deviancy, human sexuality through the life cycle, and contemporary sexual issues.

PSY 491-3 Topics in Psychology and Counseling 1-3 credit

Special topics of varied interest are offered as needed and as resources permit.

PSY 494 Honors Introduction to Psychology 1-3 credit

An honors course exploring the scientific study of human behavior. In this course, students will be introduced to the history of psychology, current paradigms and theories, research methods, and statistical techniques. Major topics of learning will include personality, brain and behavior, social interaction, sensation and reality, psychological disorders and their treatment, conditioning and learning, gender and sexuality.

Religion

REL 223 Introduction to World Religions 3 credit

The world’s great religions, including Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism are studied with a comparison to Christianity. Each religion is then considered in light of its anthropological and cultural influences.

REL 303 Engaging Islam 3 credit

This course provides as overview of Islam, including its beginnings and expansion, the beliefs and practices of formal and folk Islam, Islamic sects, the identity of women, Islam in the United States, global Islam today and bridges for communicating with Muslims.

REL 313 Folk Religions and the Occult 3 credit

A study of animistic belief systems and folk religions. Emphasis is placed on cultural adaptation and everyday practices. Includes a review of traditional and modern occult movements.

REL 323 Understanding Eastern Religions 3 credit

An introduction to the history, beliefs, and major writings of Eastern religious traditions. Emphasis is placed on the intersection of each belief system with everyday practice.

REL/PHL 353 Traditions of Spirituality 3 credit

An introduction to the methodology of comparative religions and a critical exploration of various religious traditions including, but not limited to: Animism, Buddhism, Hinduism, Mormonism, Islam, mysticism, and occultism. An understanding of the Judeo-Christian tradition is assumed.

REL 363 Philosophy of Religions 3 credit

A critical exploration of philosophy in relation to and within historic and contemporary religious systems. Emphasis will be placed on the interaction of secular philosophies and various religious systems and the use of philosophy by systems in relation to the role of intellect, apologetics, other religions, God, salvation, history, eternity, etc.

Science (Natural)

SCI 113 General Biology 3 credit

An introduction to biology. Topics covered included basic chemistry, cell structure and function, genetics, and biotechnology. An overview of the major groups of organisms is included with an emphasis on the species that affect human health.
Early Childhood Education majors must take corresponding laboratory.

SCI 123 General Biology 3 credit

An introduction to biology. Topics covered included basic chemistry, cell structure and function, genetics, and biotechnology. An overview of the major groups of organisms is included with an emphasis on the species that affect human health.
Early Childhood Education majors must take corresponding laboratory.

SCI 133 Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 credit

A study of the structure and function of the human body with an overview of cellular chemistry, the basics of metabolism, cells and tissue types, integumentary system, muscular system, skeletal system, nervous system, endocrine system, circulatory system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, lymphatic system, and reproductive systems.
Early Childhood Education majors must take corresponding laboratory.

SCI 143 Ecology and Environmental Science 3 credit

A study of the relationships and interactions between living organisms and their environment. Attention is given to ecosystems, use of natural resources, pollution, and endangered species.
Early Childhood Education majors must take corresponding laboratory.

SCI 153 Earth and Space Science 3 credit

This course introduces students to the disciplines represented by the earth sciences. An earth system science approach is used, emphasizing the interaction between the various components of the earth system. Basic principles of geology, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy are explored with a focus on the importance of stewardship of the earth.
Early Childhood Education majors must take corresponding laboratory.

SCI 311 Physical Science Laboratory 1 credit

This course deals with experiences that relate to classroom discussion in SCI 113.
Required of Education Majors who take SCI 113. $25 lab fee.

SCI 321 General Biology Laboratory 1 credit

This course deals with experiences that relate to classroom discussion in SCI 123.
Required of Education Majors who take SCI 123. $25 lab fee.

SCI 331 Human Anatomy and Physiology 1 credit

Laboratory This course deals with experiences that relate to classroom discussions in SCI 133.
Required of Education Majors who take SCI 133. $25 lab fee.

SCI 341 Ecology and Environmental 1 credit

Laboratory This course deals with experiences that relate to classroom discussion in SCI 143.
Required of Education majors who take SCI 143. $25 lab fee.

SCI 351 Earth and Space Science 1 credit

Laboratory This course deals with experiences that relate to a classroom discussion in SCI 153.
Required of Education Majors who take SCI 153. $25 lab fee.

SCI 491-3 Topics in Natural Science 1-3 credit

Special topics of varied interest are offered as needed and as resources permit.

SCI 443 Honors Ecology and Environmental Science 3 credit

A study of the relationships and interactions between living organisms and their environment. Attention is given to ecosystems, use of natural resources, pollution, and endangered species.
Early Childhood Education majors must take corresponding laboratory

Secondary Education

SEC 373 Curriculum and Methodologies 3 credit

This course will explore current practices in the teaching of language arts in secondary schools. Prospective teachers enrolled in this course will learn to plan appropriate learning activities, to assess their students’ progress, and to reflect on their own teaching and learning experiences.

SEC 446 Student Teaching 12 credit

Student teaching is a 15-week capstone semester in which the pre-service teacher integrates the pedagogical content knowledge acquired in the teacher education program in either a middle/junior high or a senior high school. This is a hands-on experience in which the student teacher candidate progresses from assisting the classroom teacher to gradually assuming control of the classroom for the entire day. The student teacher candidate participates fully in the life of the classroom by planning and implementing instruction, managing the classroom environment, assessing student progress, and working with school personnel.
Student Teaching must be taken concurrently with SEC 471, Student Teaching Seminar.

SEC 471 Student Teaching Seminar 1 credit

The student teaching seminar provides small group interaction with the student teaching supervisor and fellow student teacher candidates to share experiences of the student teaching placements. Final certification requirements and school law issues of concern to a classroom teacher are discussed. Assistance with navigating the job search process, including resume writing and interviewing is also included.
SEC 471 must be taken concurrently with SEC 466.

Sociology

SOC 103 Life Formation 3 credit

A practical study of the classic spiritual disciplines that are essential to lifelong spiritual formation from a Pentecostal perspective. The course will emphasize intentional and holistic applications in daily living.

SOC 203 Introduction to Social Sciences 3 credit

A study of general principles of sociology, anthropology, and political science. Reviews the basic institutions of society with particular emphasis on family, kinship, and group relationships; religious structures; ethnography, multiculturalism and diversities of human cultures; and principles of government and economics.

SOC 213 Women’s Leadership Issues 3 credit

The student will examine the ethical, social and professional conduct of the Christian woman in leadership. Biblical standards for professional conduct will be considered.

SOC 223 Youth Culture 3 credit

A study of social, cultural, and generational distinctiveness among teenage groups and sub-cultures. This includes understanding, connecting with, and confronting youth culture. How to approach the critical issues faced by the emerging generations in the counseling role of the youth pastor will be researched and presented by students.

SOC 243 Contemporary Social Issues 3 credit

A sociological analysis of major social concerns such as poverty, violence, crime, addiction, deviance, social disorganization, urbanization, and effects of mass me-dia. The role of the Christian worker in dealing with these issues is emphasized.

SOC 313 Marriage and the Family 3 credit

A study of interpersonal relationships in the family emphasizing marital adjustment and communication.

SOC 323Biblical/Social Justice3 credit

Biblical justice is examined through a series of Scripture passages as a foundation to the Christian’s perspective on social justice. Students explore biblical teaching on evil, sin, conflict and injustice for current social problems and theological formulation. Topics such as poverty, world hunger, homelessness, revolution, political unrest, human trafficking and child labor will be contemplated in relation to restorative justice, global reconciliation, reform and development.

SOC 333 The City in Context 3 credit

A sociological look at the unique culture and dynamics of urban cities. Explores issues relevant to migration, ethnicity, pluralism, immigration, and marginalization in the urban context. The course is designed to help students engage in cross-cultural learning experiences that will enable them to demonstrate a genuine understanding of what it means to work and live in the city. Course taught at the Urban Center.

SOC 353 New Frontiers of Aging 3 credit

This course is an exploration of the future of aging in America and the trends which may result from advances in technology, medicine, transportation, living and working environments, and leisure opportunities. The implications of these changes and societal response is the focus of this study.

SOC 403 African-American Experience 3 credit

A historical and sociological study of African-American culture and its contribution to American society. Urban conditions of the African-American community caused by economic impoverishment, political disenfranchisement, and social marginalization are studied in depth.

SOC 414 Ethnic Study: French Culture 3 credit

A survey of the French-speaking world with its cultural, historical, socio-economic, political and religious beliefs. The course will foster in students an ability to identify distinctive patterns of thought and behavior that contribute to the formation of French cultures. This class will also foster a critical and informed familiarity with the various cultures in the francophone world - in Europe, Africa, the Americas, and the South Pacific.

SOC 415 Ethnic Study: French Culture 3 credit

An overview of historical, cultural, communal, and religious aspects of Asian populations in North American cities. A contextual focus designed to understand this culturally distinct segment of American society is discussed from a number of integrative perspectives.

SOC 416 The Hispanic Challenge in North America 3 credit

The course will study the growth and prevailing immigrations trends of the fastest growing sector of North American culture. Particular attention is given to Hispanic migration, multi-ethnicity, and the unique challenges of first- and second-generation immigrants.

SOC 417Indian and Pakistani Culture 3 credit

Understanding the foundations of Indian and Pakistani culture within the context of the vast immigration to the North American cities is the key focus of the course. Contextual issues designed to understand this culturally distinct segment of American society are discussed from a number of integrative perspectives.

SOC 418Ethnic Study: Hispanics & People of Latin Descent 3 credit

This course attempts to give students an understanding of distinguishing differences of Hispanic culture both in Latin America and in North America, including the immigration which affects both. Contextual issues designed to understand this culturally distinct segment of society will be discussed from a number of integrative and sociological perspectives in order to better serve and reach them with the Gospel.

SOC 419Sociological Aspects of Deaf Education 3 credit

This course analyzes the historical background and current trends of Deaf education and its impact on the sociological development, worldview and culture of a Deaf/hard of hearing individual.
For Deaf Studies participants only.

SOC 491-3Topics in Social Science 1-3 credit

Special topics of varied interest are offered as needed and as resources permit.

Special Education

SPE 223 Introduction to Exceptionalities 3 credit

This course provides an overview of the basic characteristics and unique life and educational needs of individuals who have been determined to be exceptional in mental, physical, and/or emotional characteristics. Students will explore the validity of previously held beliefs, formulate new concepts, and acquire the tools necessary to challenge misconceptions, whether personal or other. The application of new information relating to the understanding of individuals with disabilities is achieved through activities promoting self-awareness and reflection.

SPE 403 Introduction to Exceptionalities 3 credit

Students will explore the validity of previously held beliefs, formulate new concepts, and acquire the tools necessary to challenge misconceptions, whether personal or other. The application of new information relating to the understanding of individuals with disabilities is achieved through activities promoting self-awareness and reflection.
Prerequisites: EDU 103, SPE 223.

Social Work

SWK 123 Introduction to Social Work 3 credit

Introduction to the basic concepts of social welfare as an institution and social work as a profession. The integration of professional social work practice, values, and ethics with a faith-based worldview is explored. The course provides an opportunity for students to test their interest in the social work profession by introducing them to the arenas in which social workers practice and the knowledge, values, and ethics that underlie the profession.

SWK 143 Social Welfare History 3 credit

Examines social welfare development in the United States and internationally, specifically the social, political, and institutional responses to the poor and disenfranchised. This course includes a review of social work as a function of religion and philanthropy and its transformation into a profession.
Prerequisite: SWK 123.

SWK 233 Substance Abuse 3 credit

This course offers an overview of substance abuse and dependency. Theories of addiction and treatment are explored. Assessment and intervention techniques are developed for work with individuals of various age, gender, race and cultural groups.
Prerequisite: SWK 123.

SWK 243 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I 3 credit

Provides a conceptual and theoretical framework for understanding human behavior and the social environment from an ecological perspective. Students explore how biological, psychological, sociological, cultural and spiritual variables influence the development of individuals and families, as well as groups, communities, and institutions. Using this knowledge base, students learn to approach their work with clients from an informed perspective that considers diversity. The impact of diversity, discrimination, and oppression on development is also explored.
Prerequisites: SWK 123, PSY 223, PSY 283.

SWK 263 Social Welfare Policy and Services 3 credit

Social policy and service delivery in social service agencies is explored, as is the creation of social welfare policy and legislation in the United States. The political, ideological, and economic values underlying policy creation are examined. Within this context major fields of social work practice are reviewed. Models of change at the policy level in communities and organizations are discussed. The integration of Christian and social work values in policy practice is explored.
Prerequisites: SWK 123, SWK 143.

SWK 303 Spirituality and Social Work 3 credit

Explores the role of spirituality in the field of social work. Examines public, private, and faith-based initiatives that meet the needs of individuals and families in various settings. Introduces models of practice that address spiritual issues and the dynamics of social work.
Prerequisite: SWK 123.

SWK 313 Public Social Service 3 credit

The Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Handbook states that the majority of Social Workers are employed by the state in public social services. This course is designed to expose and educate students about the functions and services available through public social services. The course is also designed to prepare students to take the state social service exam. The course will also provide students with a link to field placements and possible employment with a state social service agency.
Prerequisite: SWK 123.

SWK 323 Studies in Racial & Ethnic Diversity 3 credit

This course approaches the study of diverse populations in the U.S. from social, literary, historical, religious and political perspectives. Stories (both fiction and nonfiction), articles, essays and commentaries are utilized to enable students to learn about the importance of understanding diversity, the experiences of diverse populations in our society, and the means by which the barriers that prevent cross-cultural understanding may be challenged and ultimately removed. The leadership roles of Christian organizations are reviewed. This course serves as an Ethnic Studies option.
Prerequisite: SWK 123.

SWK 333 Community Mental Health 3 credit

Focuses on practice models and theoretical perspectives in mental health care, with emphasis upon cultural competency, prevention, and interdisciplinary approaches to psychosocial treatment and rehabilitation services. This course will instruct students how to develop and implement functional assessments, resource assessments, and formation of plans to meet service needs. The conceptualization and structuring of mental health resources and services to the family, church, community and the role of social work in the provision of these services will be explored.
Prerequisite: SWK 123.

SWK 373 Social Work Practice I 3 credit

This course offers an introduction to generalist social work practice with individuals. An opportunity to acquire the foundational-level knowledge and skills required for micro social work practice is provided. Basic communication and helping skills are emphasized.
Prerequisite: SWK 123.

SWK 383 Social Work Practice II 3 credit

Building upon the skills acquired to work with individuals in Social Work Practice I, Practice II focuses upon the practice skills necessary to work effectively with families, groups, and organizations.
Prerequisite: SWK 123, SWK 373.

SWK 391 Social Work Practice III 3 credit

This course introduces the student to social work practice through site visits to various community social service providers and supervised field placement experience. Junior Fieldwork compliments the student’s academic work through practical experience in social work practice. Under the supervision of an agency field instructor, the student learns beginning social work tasks and functions while applying theory to social work practice situations. Concurrent with fieldwork, students participate in an on-campus seminar with other junior social work majors.
Prerequisites: SWK 123, SWK 373, SWK 383.

SWK 403 Ethics and Practice 3 credit

This course builds upon generalist practice knowledge and provides a concentrated study and understanding of social work values and ethics on the micro and macro levels, and their application to direct practice, social policy formulation/application and organizational policies and procedures. Emphasis will be placed on the NASW Code of Ethics. This course provides students with a strong understanding of the role of ethics in social work practice and the tools to make appropriate ethical decisions as a beginning generalist social worker.
Prerequisites: SWK 123, SWK 373, SWK 383.

SWK 411 Research Design in Behavioral and Social Sciences 3 credit

Course includes instruction in the scientific method of applied and basic research and requires formulation of a research problem and hypothesis, research design, field research, and writing of a major research report. Students will learn the purpose and goals of social work research as well as the scientific approach to social work research. Student will be familiar with social work journal articles and outcomes of social work research studies. They will learn how to forum-late hypotheses, design a research study, and will be required to write a scientific research paper.
Prerequisite: MTH 203.

SWK 423 Human Behavior in the Social Environment II 3 credit

Provides a conceptual and theoretical framework for understanding human behavior and the social environment from an ecological perspective. Students explore how biological, psychological, sociological, cultural and spiritual variables influence the development of groups, communities, and institutions. Using this knowledge base, students learn to approach their work with groups, communities, institutions from an informed perspective that considers diversity. The impact of diversity, discrimination, and oppression on community and institutional development is also explored.
Prerequisites: SWK 123, SWK 243, SWK 263.

SWK 433 & SWK 443 Senior Seminar I & II in Social Work Practice (fall and spring, 3 credits each semester)

These are the culminating, integrative practice courses of the social work major. Concurrent with field practicum, this seminar course allows for the integration of theory, methods, skills, and values of generalist practice with knowledge and experience gained in the student’s field placement. The seminar instructor serves as the field liaison for the student in field placement. This provides the student with support, supervision, and an integrative educational experience.
Corequisites: SWK 453 & SWK 463 respectively.
Prerequisites: SWK 123, 143, 233, 243, 263, 373, 383, and 391.

SWK 453 & SWK 463 Senior Field Practicum (fall and spring, 3 credits each semester)

Supervised Social Work practice in selected social service agencies and host settings. 200 hours in the field each semester is required. Classroom knowledge is connected to practical experience, allowing for advanced integration of knowledge and practice. Professional identity and the foundational skills for social work practice are developed.
Corequisites: SWK 433 & SWK 443 respectively.
Prerequisites: SWK 123, 143, 233, 243, 263, 373, 383, and 391.

Theology

THE 114 Biblical Theology of Missions from a Pentecostal Perspective 3 credit

An introduction to the biblical mandate for missions as recorded throughout the Old and New Testaments. This course also emphasizes principles of the indigenous church, roles of the sending church, the layperson and the missionary, in fulfilling Christ’s Great Commission. The personal call to missions is also studied.
Prerequisites: OLT 123, NWT 113.

THE 233 A/G Doctrine and History 3 credit

An introduction to the history, structure, and belief of the AG in the context of Christian theology and history.

THE 243 Theology I 3 credit

A study of the introduction to theology, the defense of the faith, and the doctrines of the Bible and revelation, God, creation, and angels. Special attention is given to Assemblies of God issues (Technically: Pro-legomena, Apologetics, Bibliology, Theology Proper, Cosmology, and Angelology.)
Prerequisites: OLT 123 and NWT 113.

THE 303 Theology II 3 credit

A study of the doctrines of humanity, sin, Christ, and salvation. Special attention is given to Assemblies of God issues. (Technically: Anthropology, Hamartiology, Christology, and Soteriology.)
Prerequisites: OLT 123, NWT 113.

THE 313 A Biblical Theology of Worship 3 credit

Introduction to the biblical basis of worship, a practical application of worship leading skills and the discussion and practice of hymn, choral, and chorus selections. The role of corporate worship in relation to preaching and the larger ministry of the church, with congregational response, will be explored.

THE 353 Theology III 3 credit

A study of the doctrines of the Holy Spirit, the Church, and death and the end times. Special attention is given to Assemblies of God issues. (Technically: Pnuematology, Ecclesiology, and Eschatology: Personal and General.)
Prerequisites: OLT 123, NWT 113.

THE 422 Contemporary Theology 3 credit

A study of important theological thinkers and movements from the 20th Century to the present.
Prerequisite: Senior class standing or permission of instructor.

THE 463 New Testament Theology 3 credit

An examination of the theological unity and diversity of the New Testament, with emphasis upon the unique contributions of the different New Testament writers. Special attention is given to key theological concepts.
Prerequisites: NWT 113 and BIB 200.

THE 473 Old Testament Theology 3 credit

The study of special revelation in its Old Testament historical setting as themes emerge in the progressive revelation of God. The varied emphases and approaches of contemporary Old Testament theologians are surveyed.
Prerequisites: OLT 123 and BIB 200.

THE 483 Theological Studies Capstone Experience 3 credit

This course serves as the capstone course for theology students in which advanced research, exegetical and theological skills will be applied through a major writing project. The major project must include field research (i.e., interviews, local church interaction, various ministries, etc.) in addition to academic research. The student is responsible to consult with the Church Ministries Chair to be assigned to the best-suited professor for his or her chosen subject. The selected professor will serve as the supervisor and evaluator for the student’s work and help tailor the ways in which the selected topic will be processed, evaluated, and presented.

THE 491-3 Topics in Theology 3 credit

Special topics of varied interest are offered as needed and as resources permit.

Youth Ministry

YTH 173 Introduction to Youth Ministry 3 credit

This course is designed to give an introductory understanding of the foundational elements of successful youth ministry. It includes developing a philosophy of youth ministry; personal spiritual and character formation; and strategies for continued professional growth.

YTH 313 The Minister of Youth 3 credit

Focuses on the development of healthy youth pastors who will run well and finish strong the race marked out for them. The spiritual, physical, emotional, and professional health of the minister of youth is addressed and developed through the disciplines of journaling, personal accountability and servant hood.

YTH 413Youth Ministry Leadership3 credit

This course focuses on growing healthy relationships with the senior pastor, youth ministry staff, congregation, and community. Students will learn how to recruit and develop volunteer staff and plan and implement youth services, outreaches, and special events that reflect the vision of the local church and the needs represented within the community.

YTH 491-3 Topics in Youth Ministry 1-3 credit

Special Topics of varied interest are offered as needed and as resources permit.