Family Studies

Bachelor of Arts127 Credits

The Family Studies Program is designed to prepare students for a variety of professional roles, both in and outside the church, focusing on attending to the needs of families. Family Studies offers an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the well-being and healthy development of individuals and families over the lifespan. This includes dynamic relations within the family as well as the family’s interactions with broader social institutions. The program incorporates coursework and supervised field experience giving the student the tools needed for successful service to families.

Graduates of this program will be qualified to work in many different human services and health care settings including (but not limited to) day-care centers, drug and alcohol treatment centers, hospitals, child and domestic abuse centers, family and community organizations, parent-child education programs, healthcare and social service agencies, runaway shelters, nursing homes, assisted living, other types programs for older people, churches, other Christian education settings, and cross-cultural efforts.

The online course catalog tool is for informational and reference purposes only and may change without notice. To access the official catalog, click here to download as a PDF.
 
  1. The student will be able to communicate the biblical text in oral and written forms in an audience appropriate manner.
  2. The student will be able to locate, evaluate, and utilize biblical, theological, and related information in ministry related endeavors.
  3. The student will be able to establish and maintain professional demeanor and relationships within the church and community.
  4. The student will be able to articulate and model essential spiritual disciplines for personal growth.
  5. The student will be able to effectively provide counsel, support and ministry to families in diverse structures and stages of development, and serve families and individuals in need through collaboration with families, schools, health and social services agencies, businesses, and government entities.
Course Code
Course Name
Credits
BIB/NWT/OLT/THE
Courses
9 cr
CMS/DIG/MTN
Courses
2 cr
FNA
Fine Arts Course
3 cr
HIS 213, 223, 233, 243
US or World History Course
3 cr
LIT
Choose One
3 cr
MTH
Math Course
3 cr
PHE
Activity Course
1 cr
SCI
Science Course
3 cr
TOTAL
 
64 credits

For students seeking to pursue graduate education, most graduate programs require a minimum GPA of 3.0 for entrance.

Course Descriptions & Related Information

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Core Requirements

BIB 103 Introduction to Biblical Interpretation 3 credits

A practical introduction to the study of the Bible. The course provides an overview of fundamental issues of interpretation, inspiration, manuscripts, and translation. Emphasis is on basic approaches to Bible study and appropriate use of biblical reference tools.
Only required for non-ministry majors.

BIB 200 Biblical Theology 3 credits

A study of the major biblical and theological themes of both testaments. Emphasis on discovering the flow of ideas that bind the different books of the Bible into a unified whole.
Prerequisite: OLT 123, NWT 113.

COM 123 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 credits

A basic course in public speaking designed to provide both theory and practice in principles of effective speech composition and communication.

ENG 123 College Writing and Research 3 credits

This course stresses the writing process and introduces the skills necessary to conduct college-level research. Emphasis is placed on argumentative and analytical writing supported by research.
A passing grade of C- or higher is required.

HIS 213 Ancient and Medieval World History 3 credits

A survey of world civilization from the beginning of civilization to the Renaissance. Special attention is given to major events, individuals, and the cultural contributions of each civilization.

HIS 223 Modern and Contemporary World History  3 credits

A survey of world civilization from the Enlightenment to the present. Special attention is given to major events, individuals, and the cultural contributions of each civilization.

HIS 233 U.S. History – Colonization to Reconstruction 3 credits

A survey of the major events and individuals in United States history from Colonization to Reconstruction. Critically examines various topics of interpretive interest in American history such as the coming of the Europeans, Puritanism, religious freedom, the Revolution, slavery, immigration, industrialization, urbanization, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.

HIS 243 U.S. History – Reconstruction to the Present 3 credits

A survey of the major events and individuals in United States history from just after Reconstruction to the present. Critically examines various topics of interpretive interest in American history such as immigration, industrialization, urbanization, the rise of Big Business, Imperialism, the New Deal, the Cold War, Vietnam, the Civil Rights Movement, etc.

LIT 303 The Theology of C. S. Lewis 3 credits

This course explores the writing of C. S. Lewis, who insisted his works be judged by their literary merit and not only their theology. Themes of pain and suffering, the cultural relevance of Christianity, and biblical reflection in Lewis’s fiction and apologetics will be analyzed.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 347 A Novel Conversion 3 credits

The course grapples with the fundamental questions of human experiences from a religious or spiritual perspective. Some Biblical works will be included; however, the focus will be on how religious ideas and concerns have informed an enormous diversity of literary productions drawn on a variety of traditions (including non-Western and non-monotheistic ones.)
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 353 Biblical Literature and its Contemporary Counterparts 3 credits

This course will offer students the opportunity to read widely among the various literatures of the Bible and its literary counterparts found in poetry, prose, and fiction. The course will attempt to explore and analyze the relationship between the sacred and the secular by using works from John Milton, C.S. Lewis, T.S. Eliot, George Herbert, William Shakespeare, Emily Dickinson, and several others. Several traditional as well as modern models of literary criticism will be considered.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

NWT 113 New Testament Survey 3 credits

A panoramic view of the chief events, prominent characters, main themes and salient teachings of each New Testament book in relation to its historical, geographical and cultural contexts.

OLT 123 Old Testament Survey 3 credits

A study of the historical settings, literary features, authorship, theological teachings, and general content of the books of the Hebrew Bible. This survey provides a factual and practical groundwork for further studies in the Old Testament.

PHE 281 Health and Nutrition 1 credit

This course is an overview of personal health and stress management strategies for identifying and preventing health problems. Successful exercise, wellness, and nutrition programs are introduced. Maybe taken one time only.
This course is required of all students.

PHL 113 Worldviews 3 credits

This course will examine and apply principles involved in the development of a worldview. The course will emphasize the development and application of a Christian worldview. Special emphasis will be given to critical, creative, and Christian thinking skills.

PSY 223 Introduction to Psychology 3 credits

An introduction to the basic concepts of human behavior, motivation, emotion and personality, and a survey of the contemporary psychological field.

SOC 103 Life Formation 3 credits

A practical study of the classic spiritual disciplines that are essential to lifelong spiritual formation from a Pentecostal perspective. The course will emphasize intentional and holistic applications in daily living.

SOC 223 Youth Culture 3 credits

A study of social, cultural, and generational distinctiveness among teenage groups and sub-cultures. This includes understanding, connecting with, and confronting youth culture. How to approach the critical issues faced by the emerging generations in the counseling role of the youth pastor will be researched and presented by students.

SOC 243 Contemporary Social Issues 3 credits

A sociological analysis of major social concerns such as poverty, violence, crime, addiction, deviance, social disorganization, urbanization, and effects of mass me-dia. The role of the Christian worker in dealing with these issues is emphasized.

THE 233An Introduction to the History & Theology of the A/G 3 credits

An introduction to the history, structure, and belief of the AG in the context of Christian theology and history.

Major Requirements

BUS 373 Nonprofit Start-Up & Fundraising 3 credits

Introduction to the nature, role and unique challenges of nonprofit organizations. Includes techniques and projects for nonprofit start-up and fundraising. Examines the trend of faith-based nonprofits, their structures and relationships to the community and the church. Case study applications cover health care, education, charitable, community, cultural and faith-based organizations.

PSY 303 Biological Psychology 3 credit

A study of interrelationship between the psychological and physiological bases of human behavior including analysis of emotions, motivation and perception.
Prerequisite: PSY 223.

PSY 313 Theories of Personality 3 credit

A study of theories relating to the development and structure of personality. Biographies are included enabling students to contextualize the social and family dynamics of major theorists.
Prerequisites: PSY 223 and PSY 283.

PSY 463 Theories and Techniques of Counseling 3 credit

A review of major counseling orientations with specialized techniques suitable for use in various counseling settings. Diagnostic instruments for effective assessment will be introduced as part of the curriculum.
Prerequisite: PSY 223.

PSY 490 Human Sexuality 3 credit

A study of the biological, psychological, and social dimensions of human sexuality. Focus on biblical principles, formation of gender roles, sexual identity, sexual deviancy, human sexuality through the life cycle, and contemporary sexual issues.

CRE 153 Children’s Ministries 3 credits

A specialized study of developing and evaluating children’s ministries and resources as it pertains to specific programs such as Bible clubs, Kid’s Crusades, children’s church, music, drama, and other children’s activities.

EDU 103 Child Development 3 credit

This course examines the physical, intellectual, emotional, social, and spiritual development of the child from early childhood through adolescence, including the study of how children/adolescents learn and acquire knowledge. Special attention will be given to leading theories of development and their implications in educational settings.

EDU 113 Adolescent Development 3 credit

This course examines the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to the adolescent’s cognitive, social, sexual, emotional, and moral development. Through course readings, class discussions, and student assignments, students will apply knowledge of adolescent development to professional settings in the U.S. (i.e., school, classroom, NGO, and/ or church).

FSP 273Family Studies Practicum: Observation 2 credits

This phase of the Family Studies practicum sequence provides a supervised experience in an approved family services setting. Observation is the first of three practicums that provide the learner with a deeper understanding the real-world application of family studies in the market place or non-profit arenas. Students will achieve this understanding through required readings, meetings with the supervisory professor and observations of the field supervisor in professional settings.

FSP 373Family Studies Practicum: Immersion 3 credits

This phase of the practicum sequence moves students beyond the observation stage to a more hands on approach. Students will be required learn from and volunteer with a family service professional. Required readings, classroom knowledge, and interaction with a supervisory professor are required. Professional identity and the foundational skills for family service will be developed.
Prerequisite: FSP 273.

FSP 473Family Studies Practicum: Internship 3 credits

This phase of the practicum sequence provides a supervised experience in direct service with families in the community or church. All internships must be approved and processed through the Internship office. Students are required to complete practical fieldwork in addition to written work. A field supervisor will assess student performance during the internship. Internships hours will be served throughout the course of a semester. A comprehensive journal is required that addresses the student’s activities during the internship and issues of development in their area of ministry. Internships are designed to address the student’s focus of development and future plans.
Prerequisites: FSP 273 and FSP 373.

PST 303 Caregivers at Risk 3 credits

This course is a study of the basic principles essential to maintaining health in the context of church-related ministries. An emphasis is given to developing a Christ-centered lifestyle. Psychological assessments are administered to assist students in identifying personal issues that hinder psychological well-being and impede transformational change. Through small group exercises and non-judgmental community, students are encouraged to develop relationships that facilitate support and accountability.

PST 353 Age-Specific Student Ministries 3 credits

Youth Ministry can vary greatly from middle school to high school to college. This course takes an in-depth look at how we can address the needs of these age groups, what challenges are faced in reaching an discipling these age groups, and strategies for developing viable ministries to address the unique needs and challenges of these three age-focused groups. Students will be exposed to several outside ministries to observe how the church is currently focusing on each specific age group.

PST 483Senior Capstone Experience1 credit

The culminating preparation for ministerial vocation for seniors in practical ministry majors. In com- munity, students reflect on their experiences, refine skills, prepare portfolios, and work on job placement. (Theological and Biblical Studies Majors take THE 483, Theological Studies Capstone, instead.)

PSY 333 Pastoral Counseling 3 credits

An introduction to the pastoral perspective in counseling. A study of the biblical basis for counseling will be conducted. Emphasis will be given to a survey of techniques for premarital, marriage, family, career guidance, grief, and pre-referral counseling.
Prerequisite: PSY 223.

PSY 353 Community Psychology 3 credits

An introduction to the basic concepts in community mental health, from theories, to research, to actual settings in which students may work or volunteer. Strategies for changing the lives of others in the community for the better will be a focus of this course.
Prerequisites: PSY 223.

PSY 414 Marriage and Family Therapy 3 credits

Students will receive specialized training in marriage and family counseling from a systems perspective. Hypothetical cases will be conceptualized, assessed and diagnosed from this orientation. Interventions unique to this approach will be examined.
Prerequisite: PSY 223.

SOC 353 New Frontiers of Aging 3 credits

This course is an exploration of the future of aging in America and the trends which may result from advances in technology, medicine, transportation, living and working environments, and leisure opportunities. The implications of these changes and societal response is the focus of this study.

SPE 223 Introduction to Exceptionalities 3 credits

This course provides an overview of the basic characteristics and unique life and educational needs of individuals who have been determined to be exceptional in mental, physical, and/or emotional characteristics. Students will explore the validity of previously held beliefs, formulate new concepts, and acquire the tools necessary to challenge misconceptions, whether personal or other. The application of new information relating to the understanding of individuals with disabilities is achieved through activities promoting self-awareness and reflection.

SWK 123 Introduction to Social Work 3 credits

Introduction to the basic concepts of social welfare as an institution and social work as a profession. The integration of professional social work practice, values, and ethics with a faith-based worldview is explored. The course provides an opportunity for students to test their interest in the social work profession by introducing them to the arenas in which social workers practice and the knowledge, values, and ethics that underlie the profession.

SWK 243 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I 3 credits

Provides a conceptual and theoretical framework for understanding human behavior and the social environment from an ecological perspective. Students explore how biological, psychological, sociological, cultural and spiritual variables influence the development of individuals and families, as well as groups, communities, and institutions. Using this knowledge base, students learn to approach their work with clients from an informed perspective that considers diversity. The impact of diversity, discrimination, and oppression on development is also explored.
Prerequisites: SWK 123, PSY 223, PSY 283.

SWK 323 Studies in Racial & Ethnic Diversity 3 credits

This course approaches the study of diverse populations in the U.S. from social, literary, historical, religious and political perspectives. Stories (both fiction and nonfiction), articles, essays and commentaries are utilized to enable students to learn about the importance of understanding diversity, the experiences of diverse populations in our society, and the means by which the barriers that prevent cross-cultural understanding may be challenged and ultimately removed. The leadership roles of Christian organizations are reviewed. This course serves as an Ethnic Studies option.
Prerequisite: SWK 123.

SWK 423 Human Behavior in the Social Environment II 3 credits

Provides a conceptual and theoretical framework for understanding human behavior and the social environment from an ecological perspective. Students explore how biological, psychological, sociological, cultural and spiritual variables influence the development of groups, communities, and institutions. Using this knowledge base, students learn to approach their work with groups, communities, institutions from an informed perspective that considers diversity. The impact of diversity, discrimination, and oppression on community and institutional development is also explored.
Prerequisites: SWK 123, SWK 243, SWK 263.