Social Work

Bachelor of Social Work127 Credits

The mission of the VFCC Social Work Program is to prepare students for a life of leadership and service in the church and world, as generalist practitioners, who incorporate faith and a Christian Worldview with their commitment to professional social work service.

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Course Code
Course Name
Credits
BIB/NWT/OLT/THE
Courses
6 cr
CMS/DIG/MTN
Courses
2 cr
Elective
Elective Courses
6 cr
FNA
Fine Arts Course
3 cr
HIS/CUL/SOC
History/Culture/Society Courses
3 cr
COM/ENG/LNG
COM/ENG/LNG Courses
9 cr
PHE
Actvity Course
1 cr
TOTAL
 
58 credits
  1. Student will develop and use effective oral and Written communication in working with individuals, families, groups, communities, and colleagues. This goal corresponds with CSWE Educational Policy 2.1.3—Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments.
  2. Students will be competent in using theory to make connections between research and problems in social work practice situations. This goal corresponds with CSWE Educational Policy 2.1.6— Engage in research- informed practice and practice- informed research.
  3. Students will integrate social work practice with a Christian worldview and demonstrate tolerance regarding different perspectives. This goal corresponds with CSWE Educational Policy 2.1.4— Engage diversity and difference in practice.
  4. Students will integrate social work practice with a Christian worldview and demonstrate tolerance regarding different perspectives. This goal corresponds with CSWE Educational Policy 2.1.4— Engage diversity and difference in practice.
  5. Utilize generalist social work knowledge, skills and ethics to execute professional practice with all systems- individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. This goal corresponds to CSWE Educational Policy 2.1.7— Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment to promote or deter people in maintaining or achieving health and well-being.

Program Goals

  1. Students will be competent in critical questioning and analysis of theory in the application of social work practice activities.
  2. Students will promote the ethical and competent integration of professional social work knowledge and practice as well as Christian values and worldview.
  3. Students will know how to make connections between research and problems in social work practice situations.
  4. Students will know how to use advocacy tools at individual, family, group, community and organizational levels of practice.
  5. Students will be prepared for generalist practice and graduate study.

For students seeking to pursue graduate education, most graduate programs require a minimum GPA of 3.0 for entrance.

Course Descriptions & Related Information

View All Course Descriptions
BIB 103Introduction to Biblical Interpretation3 credits

A practical introduction to the study of the Bible. The course provides an overview of fundamental issues of interpretation, inspiration, manuscripts, and translation. Emphasis is on basic approaches to Bible study and appropriate use of biblical reference tools.
Only required for non-ministry majors.

BIB 200 Biblical Theology 3 credits

A study of the major biblical and theological themes of both testaments. Emphasis on discovering the flow of ideas that bind the different books of the Bible into a unified whole.
Prerequisite: OLT 123, NWT 113.

ENG 123 College Writing and Research 3 credits

This course stresses the writing process and introduces the skills necessary to conduct college-level research. Emphasis is placed on argumentative and analytical writing supported by research.
A passing grade of C- or higher is required. Students will receive a final grade of A, B, C, or F.

NWT 113 New Testament Survey 3 credits

A panoramic view of the chief events, prominent characters, main themes and salient teachings of each New Testament book in relation to its historical, geographical and cultural contexts.

OLT 123 Old Testament Survey 3 credits

A study of the historical settings, literary features, authorship, theological teachings, and general content of the books of the Hebrew Bible. This survey provides a factual and practical groundwork for further studies in the Old Testament.

PHE 281 Health and Nutrition 1 credits

This course is an overview of personal health and stress management strategies for identifying and preventing health problems. Successful exercise, wellness, and nutrition programs are introduced. Maybe taken one time only.
This course is required of all students.

PHL 113 Worldviews 3 credits

This course will examine and apply principles involved in the development of a worldview. The course will emphasize the development and application of a Christian worldview. Special emphasis will be given to critical, creative, and Christian thinking skills.

PSY 223 Introduction to Psychology 3 credits

An introduction to the basic concepts of human behavior, motivation, emotion and personality, and a survey of the contemporary psychological field.

SOC 103 Life Formation 3 credits

A practical study of the classic spiritual disciplines that are essential to lifelong spiritual formation from a Pentecostal perspective. The course will emphasize intentional and holistic applications in daily living.

THE 233An Introduction to the History and Theology of the AG 3 credits

An introduction to the history, structure, and belief of the AG in the context of Christian theology and history.

Major Requirements

BUS 253Macroeconomics3 credits

An overview of the organization of American economic systems. Introduces basic terminology, concepts, and issues. Examines economic variables such as consumption, government expenditures, taxes, investments, issues of unemployment, inflation, deficits, economic law, and monetary policies.
Prerequisite: MTH 213.

MTH 203Introduction to Statistics 3 credits

Statistics has become known as the mathematical tool or approach for analyzing data in order to draw reliable conclusions. This course will consider the most useful statistical methods; identify the statistical methods most widely used in education, psychology, and the social sciences; and study the mathematical formulas that are used in statistical applications.
Prerequisite: MTH 123 or MTH 213

SCI 123General Biology3 credits

An introduction to biology. Topics covered included basic chemistry, cell structure and function, genetics, and biotechnology. An overview of the major groups of organisms is included with an emphasis on the species that affect human health. Early Childhood Education majors must take corresponding laboratory.

SOC 203Introduction to Social Sciences3 credits

A study of general principles of sociology, anthropology, and political science. Reviews the basic institutions of society with particular emphasis on family, kinship, and group relationships; religious structures; ethnography, multiculturalism and diversities of human cultures; and principles of government and economics.

SOC 243Contemporary Social Issues3 credits

A sociological analysis of major social concerns such as poverty, violence, crime, addiction, deviance, social disorganization, urbanization, and effects of mass media. The role of the Christian worker in dealing with these issues is emphasized.

SWK 123Introduction to Social Work3 credits

Introduction to the basic concepts of social welfare as an institution and social work as a profession. The integration of professional social work practice, values, and ethics with a faith-based worldview is explored. The course provides an opportunity for students to test their interest in the social work profession by introducing them to the arenas in which social workers practice and the knowledge, values, and ethics that underlie the profession.

SWK 143Social Welfare History3 credits

Examines social welfare development in the United States and internationally, specifically the social, political, and institutional responses to the poor and disenfranchised. This course includes a review of social work as a function of religion and philanthropy and its transformation into a profession.
Prerequisite: SWK 123.

SWK 243Human Behavior in the Social Environment I 3 credits

Provides a conceptual and theoretical framework for understanding human behavior and the social environment from an ecological perspective. Students explore how biological, psychological, sociological, cultural and spiritual variables influence the development of individuals and families, as well as groups, communities, and institutions. Using this knowledge base, students learn to approach their work with clients from an informed perspective that considers diversity. The impact of diversity, discrimination, and oppression on development is also explored.
Prerequisites: SWK 123, PSY 223, PSY 283.

SWK 263Social Welfare Policy and Services3 credits

Social policy and service delivery in social service agencies is explored, as is the creation of social welfare policy and legislation in the United States. The political, ideological, and economic values underlying policy creation are examined. Within this context major fields of social work practice are reviewed. Models of change at the policy level in communities and organizations are discussed. The integration of Christian and social work values in policy practice is explored.
Prerequisites: SWK 123, SWK 143.

SWK 303Spirituality and Social Work 3 credits

Explores the role of spirituality in the field of social work. Examines public, private, and faith-based initiatives that meet the needs of individuals and families in various settings. Introduces models of practice that address spiritual issues and the dynamics of social work.
Prerequisite: SWK 123.

SWK 323Studies in Racial and Ethnic Diversity 3 credits

This course approaches the study of diverse populations in the U.S. from social, literary, historical, religious and political perspectives. Stories (both fiction and nonfiction), articles, essays and commentaries are utilized to enable students to learn about the importance of understanding diversity, the experiences of diverse populations in our society, and the means by which the barriers that prevent cross-cultural understanding may be challenged and ultimately removed. The leadership roles of Christian organizations are reviewed. This course serves as an Ethnic Studies option.
Prerequisite: SWK 123.

SWK 373Social Work Practice I 3 credits

This course offers an introduction to generalist social work practice with individuals. An opportunity to acquire the foundational-level knowledge and skills required for micro social work practice is provided. Basic communication and helping skills are emphasized.
Prerequisite: SWK 123.

SWK 383Social Work Practice II 3 credits

Building upon the skills acquired to work with individuals in Social Work Practice I, Practice II focuses upon the practice skills necessary to work effectively with families, groups, and organizations.
Prerequisite: SWK 123 and SWK 373.

SWK 391Social Work Practice III 3 credits

This course introduces the student to social work practice through site visits to various community social service providers and supervised field placement experience. Junior Fieldwork compliments the student’s academic work through practical experience in social work practice. Under the supervision of an agency field instructor, the student learns beginning social work tasks and functions while applying theory to social work practice situations. Concurrent with fieldwork, students participate in an on-campus seminar with other junior social work majors.
Prerequisites: SWK 123, SWK 373, SWK 383.

SWK 403Ethics and Practice3 credits

This course builds upon generalist practice knowledge and provides a concentrated study and understanding of social work values and ethics on the micro and macro levels, and their application to direct practice, social policy formulation/application and organizational policies and procedures. Emphasis will be placed on the NASW Code of Ethics. This course provides students with a strong understanding of the role of ethics in social work practice and the tools to make appropriate ethical decisions as a beginning generalist social worker.
Prerequisites: SWK 123, SWK 373, SWK 383.

SWK 411Research Design in Behavioral and Social Sciences3 credits

Course includes instruction in the scientific method of applied and basic research and requires formulation of a research problem and hypothesis, research design, field research, and writing of a major research report. Students will learn the purpose and goals of social work research as well as the scientific approach to social work research. Student will be familiar with social work journal articles and outcomes of social work research studies. They will learn how to formulate hypotheses, design a research study, and will be required to write a scientific research paper.
Prerequisite: MTH 203.

SWK 423Human Behavior in the Social Environment II3 credits

Provides a conceptual and theoretical framework for understanding human behavior and the social environment from an ecological perspective. Students explore how biological, psychological, sociological, cultural and spiritual variables influence the development of groups, communities, and institutions. Using this knowledge base, students learn to approach their work with groups, communities, institutions from an informed perspective that considers diversity. The impact of diversity, discrimination, and oppression on community and institutional development is also explored.
Prerequisites: SWK 123, SWK 243, SWK 263.

SWK 433, 443Senior Seminar I and II in Social Work Practice(fall and spring, 3 credits each semester)

These are the culminating, integrative practice courses of the social work major. Concurrent with field practicum, this seminar course allows for the integration of theory, methods, skills, and values of generalist practice with knowledge and experience gained in the student’s field placement. The seminar instructor serves as the field liaison for the student in field placement. This provides the student with support, supervision, and an integrative educational experience.
Co-requisites: SWK 453 and SWK 463 respectively. Prerequisites: SWK 123, 143, 233, 243, 263, 373, 383, and 391.

SWK 453, 463Senior Field Practicum(fall and spring, 3 credits each semester)

Supervised Social Work practice in selected social service agencies and host settings. 200 hours in the field each semester is required. Classroom knowledge is connected to practical experience, allowing for advanced integration of knowledge and practice. Professional identity and the foundational skills for social work practice are developed.
Co-requisites: SWK 433 and SWK 443 respectively. Prerequisites: SWK 123, 143, 233, 243, 263, 373, 383, and 391.